Lifestyle Report: Second Home Sales Soar During COVID-19

Lifestyle Report: Second Home Sales Soar During COVID-19

A Lifestyle Story: Portland, OR. The coronavirus is changing the way people live in many ways. With more families isolating together, many are craving more spaces outside of their primary residence where they can relax in places like Central Oregon. (The home above at 61794 Tam McArthur Loop in Bend is listed at $3.7 million with Sotheby’s.) People see the valuing of time with family, friends, and time spent together in the great outdoors. Also, many professionals aren’t tethered to their desks because they’re working remotely. Consequently, the real estate industry is seeing some new trends. There’s an uptick in sales of second homes in markets that are drivable from cities.

According to industry statistics, the number of pending sales in the Bend area was up 53% in June. And some prices in Central Oregon are sky-high.

This property at 16400 Jordan Rd. in Sisters is listed for $24,000,000. It has 14,666 square feet with 8 bedrooms and 8 baths and is listed with Sotheby’s.

In Central Oregon, according to Bend Premier Real Estate, million-dollar home sales are breaking records. “Over the years, as various sections of Bend were developed, the luxury market expanded into Pilot Butte, Awbrey Butte, and the various golf communities in town such as Awbrey Glen, Broken Top, Pronghorn and Tetherow.” Bend realtors say they are in the midst of one of the most active summer selling seasons in years and struggling to find homes to list.

It’s part of a national trend. People are fleeing their glass-enclosed, high-rise apartments for larger second homes with outdoor space.

This house in the scenic mountain town of Park City, Utah is priced at $19.5 million. Park City is a popular destination for celebrities and film industry elite during the Sundance Film Festival. Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, realtors say Park City has seen an influx of activity at the upper end of the market.

There has also been a surge of interest across California, spanning from San Diego all the way up to northern coastal regions, such as Montecito, Carmel and into Northern California’s wine country. Here’s a video of another hot spot; a $65 million dollar listing in Malibu, California.

According to Real Estate veteran, Karen Durrett, on the Northern Oregon coast, second homes are getting harder to find. The median price is also up.

In Manzanita, second homes for over $1 million have been snapped up all summer and now there are very few left for sale.

Just south of Cannon Beach there’s a modern oceanfront home for sale with an ocean view for $4,995,000. It’s 3,348 square feet and it sits on an acre.

Today’s record-low mortgage rates are also fueling interest. Since most experts forecast that mortgage rates will remain in the 3% range throughout the year, homebuyers are jumping on the low-cost mortgage train. This could help offset the higher house prices in some real estate markets.

Portland’s NAACP President Remains Optimistic About the Fight for Racial Justice

Portland’s NAACP President Remains Optimistic About the Fight for Racial Justice

Portland, OR. The President of the Portland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is feeling optimistic about the future of race relations in the Rose City. Rev. E. D. Mondainé, a renowned musician, and U.S. Army/Air Force veteran took the helm of Portland’s chapter in 2018. His voice has become increasingly important during this time of downtown protests and civil unrest. Mondainé’s says, “Even though times are bleak, we can make change. Portland is a perfect storm for change in this country and the ninety-plus days of noise is the start of revolution.”

While many organizations and individuals protesting are calling for a complete defunding of the police in Portland (and across the nation, for that matter), Rev. Mondainé says that the NAACP does not stand with the goal of abolition, but rather, reformation.

Starting in May 2020, demonstrations over the police killing of George Floyd have been held in the city of Portland, concurrent with protests in other cities around the United States and around the world.

When asked about the death of George Floyd and the reverberations across the nation, Mondainé’s said he believes Floyd’s death was nothing less than a “horizontal, modern-day lynching” and not to be convoluted else wise. (Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is charged with murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd.)

Reverend E.D. Mondainé believes in Portland and the ability of residents to confront nationwide and global equality and equity. “We’re on a mission for justice, truth, and equality. And we’ll never stop fighting for that.”

The Portland NAACP has taken a stand on many issues including renter’s rights in 2019. 

Mondainé’s spoke to Portland Society Page reporter Daniel Chilton about his views on the strategy of the Black Lives Matter movement and where the NAACP stands regarding the policing institution, as well as the prison industrial complex.

While the public conversation has primarily revolved around police institutions and police brutality, Mondainé also discussed the often-absent subject of the prison industrial complex. With Black inmates outnumbering whites by a large margin until very recently (according to Pew Research Center, this gap has begun to narrow) Rev. Mondainé says that the NAACP is trying hard to keep this conversation going and has major plans in the future to continue to address both police and prison reform; that one cannot exist without the other present.

Thousands marching into downtown Portland; a photo strikingly familiar to those of the 1960s civil rights march on Washington.

About the Portland NAACP:

Founded in 1909 in response to the ongoing violence against Black people around the country, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) is the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the nation. We have over 2,200 units and branches across the nation, along with well over 2M activists. Our mission is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

The vision of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure a society in which all individuals have equal rights without discrimination based on race.

To find out more about Portland’s NAACP branch and any upcoming events, including their monthly meetings downtown, click here. If you’re interested in donating to their cause, you can do so directly here. To register to vote for the upcoming election and make your voice heard for change, you can do so here.

Play It Forward Foundation Removes Barriers for Young Musicians

Play It Forward Foundation Removes Barriers for Young Musicians

Portland, OR. Most piano teachers and students aren’t able to sit side-by-side these days; they’re learning via zoom. That’s the case with the young teachers at the Play It Forward Foundation. It was originally established by famous Portland pianist Michael Allen Harrison and has aimed to keep young musicians moving forward since its inception. It primarily operates with two distinct missions: the first is to take in donated instruments (primarily pianos) to rehouse them in public school programs and student homes; the second aims to keep these musicians in lessons while offering new teachers consistent work.

The first mission, wherein donated instruments are rehoused into public school programs and particularly talented young musicians’ homes, is just a part of how the Play It Forward Foundation is helping the community. The program’s Executive Director, Marietta Harrison, says that they look at nearly three hundred pianos a year, ultimately accepting around one hundred of these (with sometimes up to five calls a day for potential donations). These pianos are vetted and reconditioned prior to being donated in order to offer better services to the school programs or child’s home they end up in. In a time when public school’s art funding seems to be ever-declining, the organization pays for these services out of pocket in order to better serve the community.

With classes moved entirely online for the foreseeable future, potential barriers are further erased.

Rather than simply donating and dipping, so to speak, the second part of their mission aims to keep a consistent hand within Portland’s musical community. The nonprofit’s goal here is to remove any potential barriers between the students and their music– whether that be economic, logistical, or otherwise. Started in 2017 with a mere twelve students, the program was up to one hundred students by 2019.

Online piano recitals with both Michael and Marietta Harrison present.

Prior to the COVID pandemic, the program would offer work to young teachers seeking experience who would often travel to the school or the student’s home in order to better erase these potential barriers faced. Currently, the program has gone completely online and classes are being held through Zoom meetings. Given everything going on in the world right now, Marietta Harrison says that this program has always aimed to be proactive rather than reactive; establishing itself in the community as an organization that erases barriers for students and encourages musical growth.

About Play it Forward:

Nearly 20 years ago, the City of Portland passed a measure that cut critical funding to music education in our public schools. Having benefited from free music education in public schools, that eventually led to a successful career as a composer and pianist, Michael Allen Harrison could not watch this happen silently. Play It Forward, affectionately known as PIF was born. Play It Forward distributes gently used instruments gifted by donors to students and music programs throughout the Portland Metropolitan Community.

If you’d like to donate to a great cause, you can do so here.

 

Boating Sees Unprecedented Growth During COVID-19

Boating Sees Unprecedented Growth During COVID-19

A Lifestyle Story:  Portland, OR. More sailboats and motor-yachts than usual are plying local waters. On the Willamette River, Jeff and Susan Lyon join Zach Francis and Amy Jeuck for a cruise, and it’s part of a national trend. Coronavirus restrictions are limiting travel and activities, but boating naturally allows people to abide by social distancing guidelines. The National Marine Manufacturer’s Association (NMMA) is seeing an increase in sales.

The industry organization Discover Boating, has seen unprecedented growth in June compared to the same period last year. The organization’s website DiscoverBoating.com is also attracting more females and younger audiences.

NMMA says this spring 70-percent of marine dealers nationwide say their sales have increased. The biggest growth is coming from smaller, entry-level boats, which NMMA says indicates more people are boating for the first time.

“Many first-time boat buyers invest in a boat to replace other summer traditions canceled due to the pandemic,” says NMMA rep John-Michael Donahue.

Jet skis are one purchase for first-time buyers entering the marine market. NMMA found people bought 75% more personal watercraft this May than May 2019. Wakeboard boats and other small boats like cruisers have been popular this spring.

Local sailing races and regattas, like this one on the Columbia River, include the Oregon Offshore, Swiftsure and Pacific Cup. The Portland Yacht Club also partners with the Willamette Sailing Club to offer youth sailing programs.

A record number of yacht sales is also being reported.

In the Portland area, major motor-yacht club cruises with Portland Yacht Club include Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and Labor Day events. There are stag cruises, ladies cruises, and a closing day cruise to Beacon Rock.

Discover Boating is seeing consumers gravitate toward website content that helps them get started in boating and learn how to operate their new boat. Some of the articles consumers seek out are listed below:

Local people interested in boating will need a Boater’s Education Card. Oregon law requires all motorized boat and PWC operators who are at least 16 years old and will be operating a boat over 10 hp to pass a boater safety course and to carry a boater education card. Here’s a link to the online course.

Pandemic Shakes Foundational Aspects of Luxury-Goods Industry

Pandemic Shakes Foundational Aspects of Luxury-Goods Industry

Portland, OR. A lifestyle story: With crowded stores becoming more of a distant memory since the COVID-19 crisis, some financial analysts are evaluating the impact on luxury goods. A team from the consulting firm McKinsey & Company offered research material about the topic.

While it’s too early to quantify COVID-19’s total financial toll on the sector, the pandemic has certainly shaken some of the foundational aspects of the luxury industry—and some of these changes could be permanent.

 As stores remain closed in many parts of the world, e-commerce is a crucial channel for keeping sales up, communicating with customers, and forging a sense of community around a brand. Accelerate your digital investments and shift media spending to online channels, with a focus on customer activation rather than brand building. Aside from enhancing your own websites, also consider partnerships with reputable e-retailers. Digital marketing could help not only boost online sales but also entice consumers to visit stores once they reopen.

Louis Vuitton in Beverley Hills

Wholesale Darwinism. Even before the pandemic struck, independent luxury-goods wholesalers in Europe (many of which are small, family-owned boutiques) and some of the large North American luxury department stores were already struggling—in part because of luxury brands moving to vertical integration over the past 20 years and, more recently, the growth of e-commerce. This pandemic might force some of them out of business. The damage could extend to brands that have not yet fully transitioned to a vertically integrated distribution model, as well as to upstart brands that need wholesale channels to reach new customers and to finance the development of their full collections. To survive, wholesalers are likely to adopt aggressive commercial and discount policies—which, at least in the medium term, could hurt the luxury positioning of brands that don’t have a concession model.

From global traveler to local shopper. The luxury sector appeals to a global consumer: 20 to 30 percent of industry revenues are generated by consumers making luxury purchases outside their home countries. In 2018, Chinese consumers took more than 150 million trips abroad; we estimate that purchases outside the mainland accounted for more than half of China’s luxury spending that year.1 Asian shoppers buy luxury goods outside their home countries not only to benefit from lower prices in Europe, but also because shopping has become an integral part of the travel experience: buying a brand in its country of origin comes with a sense of authenticity and excitement. With the recent travel restrictions, an important driver of luxury spending has come to a halt, and we anticipate only a gradual ramp-up in international travel, even after the restrictions are lifted. That said, Chinese consumers remain the biggest growth opportunity for the luxury sector. Brands, clearly, will need a new approach to attracting luxury shoppers. To reactivate Asian luxury consumers in their home countries, brands can focus on creating tailored local experiences, strengthening their digital and omnichannel offerings, and engaging more deeply with consumers in tier-two and -three cities. The latter will be challenging, given the limitations in both retail infrastructure and customer-service capabilities in those cities.

Shows without live audiences. Fashion weeks and trade shows have been essential ways that brands have maintained vibrant relationships with consumers and trade partners. While we expect some return to normalcy on this front, we also believe that the luxury industry—in close collaboration with fashion-week organizers and trade associations—should explore alternative ways to deliver the same kind of magic that these events offer when there are restrictions on international travel and large gatherings. Industry players might also consider pushing for a coordinated revamping of the fashion calendar, with brands simplifying and streamlining their presentation calendars.

From ownership to experience, and back again. “Experiential luxury”—think high-end hotels, resorts, cruises, and restaurants—has been one of the most dynamic and fast-growing components of the luxury sector. Millennials (those born 1980–95) opted more for experiences and “Instagrammable moments” rather than luxury items. Baby boomers (born 1946–64), too, were moving in this direction, having already accumulated luxury products over the years. While we expect the positive momentum of experiential luxury to persist, it will slow down in the short term as consumers temporarily revert to buying goods over experiences.

Hyperpolarization in performance. Even before the crisis, it made little sense to talk about the sector in terms of averages because growth rates and profit margins were so widely spread out. Even within the same segment and price point, luxury brands’ growth varied from 40 percent to negative percentages and earnings from 50 percent to single-digit percentages. We expect further polarization based on three fundamentals: the health of a brand’s balance sheet prior to the crisis, the resilience of its operating model (including its digital capacity, the agility of its supply chain, and its dependence on wholesale channels), and its response to COVID-19.

Another chance for ‘rare gems.’ Over the past decade, European luxury conglomerates, private-equity firms, and, more recently, US fashion groups and Middle Eastern investors eagerly snapped up attractive acquisition targets. As a result of the current crisis, some of these acquirers—particularly those that aren’t luxury companies themselves—could find that they have neither the core competencies nor the patience to nurture these high-potential brands, and thus might be willing to put them back on the market. Acquisitions that were once forbiddingly expensive could become viable in the postcrisis period. Such developments could result in further industry consolidation or even the formation of new luxury conglomerates.

Time and again, the luxury industry has proved capable of reinvention. We are confident about the sector’s long-term potential. But some brands will emerge from the crisis stronger, while others will struggle to preserve the integrity of their business. Much will depend on their ability to respond to the short-term urgencies related to COVID-19 while simultaneously planning and executing for the future.

While the COVID-19 pandemic has made for a challenging 2020, we are confident that, with careful planning and deft execution, the luxury-goods sector can successfully weather the crisis and emerge even stronger. The actions we’ve outlined here can help you and the other leaders in your organization navigate the challenges of today while building and strengthening your business for the longer term.

 
Oregon Golf Association Sees Uptick in Play During COVID-19

Oregon Golf Association Sees Uptick in Play During COVID-19

Woodburn, OR. “We have definitely seen an uptick on rounds of golf played since the pandemic began,” says Chief Executive Officer of the nonprofit Oregon Golf Association, Barb Trammell. “The OGA Golf Course here in Woodburn – which is home to our offices – has certainly experienced a surge in rounds. Our rounds this year are approximately 20% higher than the average of the past 3 years.” And some tournaments are still being played, like the Oregon Amateur Championship.

Bryce Wortman, Lara Tennant and Amanda Jacobs are crowned champions at the Oregon Amateur Championship on June 25th at Columbia Edgewater Country Club.

“Here in Oregon, we were fortunate that golf remained open when all non-essential businesses were shuttered. I think the fact that golf is an activity that can easily be played with social distancing and is outside attracted a lot of first-timers as well as turned those who maybe played only a handful of times into avid players,” Trammell explains.

The Oregon Golf Association (OGA) is a 501(c)(6) non-profit membership association. Founded in 1924, the OGA was originally established with the sole purpose of conducting the Oregon Amateur Championship. Since its founding more than 90 years ago, the OGA works tirelessly to promote, foster, and grow the game of golf providing a multitude of benefits and services to approximately 41,000 individual men, women, senior, and junior members at more than 400 member golf clubs throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.
The Pixie Project Continues Helping Animals During Pandemic

The Pixie Project Continues Helping Animals During Pandemic

Portland, OR. With most people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, pet companionship has become more important to many. Whether you’re in need of a new furry friend or are seeking veterinary care for your pet, the nonprofit Pixie Project is continuing to offer services. The organization has maintained community outreach despite the difficulties of staying afloat during this unprecedented time. By focusing on one-on-one appointment-only interactions, staffers are able to bring potential pets directly to people’s homes to meet for the first time.

Jessica Berg, Development Director, says they’ve recently performed about 20 feline surgeries in only 2 days.

The Pixie Project, located at 510 N.E. MLK Blvd., is a small nonprofit animal adoption and rescue center. It differs from many other local centers by not only offering pet adoption with a focus on establishing life-long homes for animals but also by offering medical attention to pet-owners who cannot shoulder the financial burden required of surgery such as spaying and neutering or more serious health concerns for animals.

The Pixie Project offers a “sliding scale” payment practice for medical attention in order to ease the financial burden on struggling pet-owners.

Jessica Berg, the Pixie Project’s Development Director, says that adoption rates are still fairly high while donations have taken a hit. The steady adoption rates should be no surprise considering the need for companionship during the stay-at-home orders. Most of the organization’s funding comes from coordinated fundraising events which have all but stopped during this time of social distancing.

Pixie Project supporters say there’s nothing more valuable during these isolating times than a happy and healthy companion.

From: Pixie Project

If you’d like to find out more about the Pixie Project, donate to a good cause, or if you’re in need of pet care services, check out the Pixie Project website here or its donation page here.

Northwest Academy Students Perform Original Musical and Raise $295,000

Northwest Academy Students Perform Original Musical and Raise $295,000

Portland, OR. The Northwest Academy hosted Club Cabaret, “The Mad Hatter’s Cocktail Party” at The Nines Hotel in downtown Portland. The event raised $295,000 for academic programs and student scholarships. Supporters at the February 29th benefit included Amy Hillman, Nicholas & Megan O’Toole, Todd McCoy & Tawnya Fox. (Photo credit, Andie Petkus) More than 200 guests came for the silent auction, cocktail party, an original musical performed by Northwest Academy students, and a live auction.

Students perform an original production called, “The Mad Hatter’s Cocktail Party.”

Educators say the Northwest Academy in downtown Portland strives to provide students with an enriching education consisting of developing their fine and performing arts skills, rather than implementing the arts only as a bonus to students education. Northwest Academy emphasizes the importance of the balance of academics and art fostering curiosity and creative thinking.

Mary Vinton Folberg, Chris Schuck, McKenzie Kerman, and Lauren Partington

Serena Schulz-Rodriguez, Sarah Santangelo, Chiharu Olsson, Lori & Peter Buss, James Olsson, Terence Barr, in back row: Marilyn Beach, Bronson & Marisa James

Zach Levow, Joe & Linda Rosinski, and Holly Levow

The Quest Foundation, along with a challenge match from Arlene Schnitzer and Jordan Schnitzer, contributed to programs and scholarships for the students.

From Northwest Academy:

Mission: Northwest Academy is committed to inspiring students to discover their intellectual and artistic voices in a creative and supportive atmosphere fueled by curiosity and constructive challenge. Vision: Northwest Academy will be recognized as a center of excellence in proficiency-based education, artfully blending academic instruction and experience.  Graduates of the school will be innovative thinkers who chart their own futures and excel in a diverse global society. Core Values: Education in both academics and arts, results in a more complete and balanced individual who, while being productive, also leads an inspired and meaningful life, talented faculty, passionate about their subject areas, and the support of free and open inquiry motivates students’ interest in learning and creative thinking, student engagement, curiosity, and creative thinking expand when nurtured by accomplished and energetic faculty who promote participation and welcome debate, students thrive in an environment where both individuality and collaboration are encouraged and fostered, proficiency-based placement enhances students’ motivation and initiative while allowing a student to work through education at relatively accelerated or a more leisurely personal pace.

Oregon Humane Society Honors Heroic Pets and People at Diamond Collar Awards

Oregon Humane Society Honors Heroic Pets and People at Diamond Collar Awards

Portland, OR. The Oregon Humane Society (OHS) honored heroic people and pets at the annual Diamond Collar Awards luncheon. The luncheon took place on February 20th at the Multnomah Athletic Club. Pets and people were recognized for their compassion, dedication, and resiliency. Organizers say the inspiring stories represent OHS’s mission of fostering an environment of respect, responsibility, and compassion for all animals. Pictured above is Kevvie the dog and Brian August. Kevvie was abandoned in the woods and suffering from gunshot wounds. OHS caretakers say this resilient dog took months to heal and trust again. Her gentle and forgiving nature allowed her to find her forever home with her new family.

Pictured above is Nancy Tonkin-Zoucha and friends

OHS Diamond Collar – Matt Zaffino and Sharon Harmon

“I am always so inspired by the OHS Diamond Collar Award honorees,” said Sharon Harmon, OHS President, and CEO. “Each of the recipients reminds us of the compassion and kindness in our community.” Harmon hosted the awards with KGW Chief Meteorologist Matt Zaffino.

OHS Diamond Collar – Ilene the kitten and Alanna Lundin

OHS Diamond Collar – George Piter and Squeak

Below are videos featuring the Diamond Collar Heroes:

George Piter: For 13 years, George and his trained therapy cats have dedicated time to visit Salem Hospital and brighten the days of patients and anyone else who may need it.

Ilene the kitten: A tiny but mighty kitten was born without eyes and discarded in the trash in Central California. After being transferred to the Oregon Humane Society for a special surgery, she went on to inspire a family and show the world that anyone can overcome their obstacles with love and determination. 

Joyce Briggs de la Fuente: Thousands of cats and kittens were entering Oregon shelters every year. Under Joyce’s leadership, she brought together animal welfare leaders, innovative planning, extensive research and data that launched the Spay and Save Program which provides an easy and affordable option to prevent unwanted litters of kittens. With this new program, Portland is now the safest place for homeless felines.

Kevvie the dog: After being abandoned in the woods and suffering from gunshot wounds, this resilient dog took months to heal and trust again. Her gentle and forgiving nature allowed her to find her forever home with her new family.

More about the Oregon Humane Society:

OHS is the largest humane society in the Northwest and adopts more animals from its Portland shelter than any other single-facility shelter on the West Coast. OHS puts no time limits on how long animals remain at the shelter—a pet stays available for adoption for as long as needed to find a loving home. If a pet in the care of OHS needs medical attention, the OHS veterinary hospital provides the pet with the same level of care you would want your own pet to receive.

Founded in 1868 by noted humanitarian Thomas Lamb Eliot, OHS is the fourth-oldest humane society in the nation. Eliot initially established OHS to stop the neglect and abuse of draft animals. The mission expanded to include companion animals and, until 1933, orphaned children.

OHS finds homes for more than 11,000 pets each year. The OHS medical team provides free and low-cost spay and neuter surgeries for thousands of pets owned by low-income families OHS educators reach more than 12,000 youths and about 2,000 adults annually through humane education programs. The OHS Second Chance program brings more than 8,000 pets annually to OHS from other shelters around the region. In the state capitol, OHS is the driving force behind efforts to improve laws that protect animals and punish offenders. 

 

PREVIEW: Northwest Film Center to Host 43rd Portland International Film Festival

PREVIEW: Northwest Film Center to Host 43rd Portland International Film Festival

Portland, OR. The Northwest Film Center will showcase and celebrate its 43rd international and regional storytelling through film. The 10-day festival will take place on March 6-15, 2020 at various locations. Some goals of the Portland International Film Festival (PIFF) are, “to gather film lovers and makers, have people be open to new ways of creative expression, and shine a spotlight on artists who go against the status quo.” Disney Pixar’s Onward will have a free community screening at noon on February 7th. (More info below.)

A three-film opening night program on Friday, March 6th will feature an off-beat indie buddy film called The Climb. Below is a look at the film’s trailer:

Portland International Film Festival organizers hope that patrons will embrace the idea of Cinema Unbound for the first time. Through this concept, PIFF aims to challenge how cinematic stories are told. 2020 also features renowned visiting curators, esteemed guests, industry leaders, and jury members in attendance—all of whom represent major film festivals, museums, and distribution companies around the globe.

Here’s information about the festival from Northwest Film Center:

Ticket information listed below:

Advance Tickets: The Northwest Film Center, 934 SW Salmon St, Portland, OR 97205 Opens March 1 — daily from 12 noon – 6 p.m. Advance tickets by phone at (503) 276-4310

Festival Passes: Currently available for sale here

Members of the Northwest Film Center’s Silver Screen Club get discounts or free entry (at the Director level and above) to Festival screenings. To learn more about membership click here

Admission prices: $14 General; $12 Portland Art Museum Members, Students, Seniors; $10 children (12 years and younger); $9 Silver Screen Club Friends, Supporters, and New Wave.

Opening Night Film and Party: $25 general; $20 Silver Screen Friends, Supporters, and New Wave. PLEASE NOTE: Attendees can purchase tickets to Opening Night for either the Whitsell Auditorium or Cinema 21 location. Opening Night party to follow in the Portland Art Museum’s Fred & Suzanne Fields (Sunken) Ballroom.

Tickets to individual screenings will be available on February 7, 2020

FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS:

Thursday, March 5, 2020

The Eyeslicer Season Two by Dan Schoenbrun and Vanessa McDonnell

United States | 2019

7 p.m. | Whitsell Auditorium | 90 mins

11 a.m. – 8 p.m. | Northwest Film Center

11 a.m. – 8 p.m. | Movie Madness Miniplex

Recently featured in GQ’s Time Capsule for the 2010s, this bonkers-yet-thoughtful 13-episode TV show blends the boldest new American filmmaking into mind-expanding, mixtape-style episodes that feature work from over 70 filmmakers.

The Eyeslicer Season 2 – from theeyeslicer.com

 

Friday, March 6, 2020 Opening Night

Three-film Opening Night program features The Climb, as well as shorts America and The Giverny Document (Single Channel). One ticket includes all
screenings, which will screen back-to-back at both venues. Attendees are welcome to come to one, or stay for all three!

PIFF 43 Opening Night radically presents varying perspectives on what it means to be alive at this moment while reflecting on the past that’s shaped us. This multi-perspective Opening Night panorama dives deep into unexpected places, expounding upon notions of race, gender, time, and nowness. Funny, painful, powerful, and electric in equal measure, PIFF 43 Opening Night subverts the notion that any one film is worthy of “Opening Night” attention. Instead, we embrace the interplay between these three storytellers and their collaborators.

America Directed by Garrett Bradley

United States | 2019 | 29 mins.

A cinematic omnibus rooted in New Orleans, challenging the idea of black cinema as a “wave” or “movement in time,” proposing instead a continuous thread of achievement.

The Giverny Document (Single Channel) Directed by Ja’Tovia Gary

United States | 2019 | 45 mins.

Filmed on location in Harlem and in Monet’s historic gardens in Giverny, this multi-textured cinematic poem meditates on the bodily integrity and creative virtuosity of black women.

5:00 p.m. – Whitsell Auditorium & Cinema 21

Giverney document, photo taken from jatovia.com

The Climb Directed by Michael Angelo Covino

United States | 2020 | 94 mins.

7:00 p.m. – Cinema 21

7:15 p.m. – Whitsell Auditorium

This buddy comedy starts with a simple premise—two lifelong pals struggle to bike up a French mountaintop—but what comes next is anyone’s guess. With incredible cinematic reinvention, ambitious long-takes, dramatic time-leaps, and a cappella interludes, the audience
is invited along for the ride, no matter where it leads.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Disney Pixar’s Onward Directed by Dan Scanlon

United States | 2020 | 91 mins.

12:00 noon – Whitsell Auditorium – Free Community Screening

5:00 p.m. – Hollywood Theatre – Silver Screen Club member presale until February 7, 2020.

Set in a suburban fantasy world, Disney and Pixar’s Onward introduces two teenage elf brothers (voices of Chris Pratt and Tom Holland) who embark on an extraordinary quest to discover if there is still a little magic left out there. Pixar Animation Studios’ all-new original feature film is directed by Dan Scanlon and produced by Kori Rae—the team behind Monsters University. Onward releases in theaters on March 6, 2020.

Trailer:

 

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Anthem: Homunculus Live Listening Party by John Cameron Mitchell

Time & Location: TBA

A creative, multi-media feast featuring a tangled story of visits to other planets, talking tumors, and song-filled telethons pitched to save the life of the protagonist, Ceann. This game-changing, audio-based story—performed LIVE—is based on Mitchell’s genre-busting
podcast by the same name and defies all conventions and expectations, with audiences experiencing a wild, 6.5-hour extravaganza of over 30 songs ranging from indie-rock to dream pop to avant-garde.

Featuring the vocal talent of Glenn Close, Cynthia Erivo, Patti LuPone, Denis O’Hare, Mari Moriarty, Alan Mandell, Ben Foster and Shalewa Sharpe.

Creator and star John Cameron Mitchell and guests in attendance.

Presented by Luminary.

Thursday, March 12, 2020

The Armory Presents: Off-Center Stage

9 p.m. – 1 a.m.

Off-Center Stage is a series of late-night programming that will feature unconventional performances from musicians, visual artists, comedians, dance, and open-format shows for the 21-and-over crowd. Each show will take place on the stages and other communal spaces in
the historic surroundings of The Armory.

PERFORMANCES AND PRESENTATIONS:

Reese Bowes — light/sound design and video projections

Auvie Sinclair — instrumental hip hop producer/beatmaker

Just Pretend — a live band featuring Darian Patrick, band member for Hedwig & The Angry Inch and In The Heights.

Disco Montana — live band fusing elements of pop, disco, country, and folk

Monday, March 9, 2020 | 7 p.m.

The Cinema Unbound Awards

Kridel Grand Ballroom, Portland Art Museum, 1119 SW Park Avenue

The Cinema Unbound Awards celebrates artists who are trying new things, thinking bigger, and pushing forward to transform filmmaking—and the world. We’ve assembled a small-but-mighty band of internationally renowned artists, creatives, and curators working against
traditional constraints of cinema.

Honoring:

Astonishing Auteur Todd Haynes (Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning writer and director; Carol, Far from Heaven, Mildred Pierce)

Creative Powerhouse John Cameron Mitchell (Tony Award-winning writer, director, and actor; Hedwig & The Angry Inch, Anthem: Homunculus, Hulu’s Shrill)

Documentary Doyenne Julie Goldman (Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning producer of over 50 feature documentaries, including Life, Animated, Buck, Weiner)

Immersive Maestro Michel Reilhac (Filmmaker, Experiential Artist and Head of VR, Venice Biennale)

Animation Arts Wizard Rose Bond (Internationally-recognized, large-scale, site-specific animations)

Curatorial Mastermind Rajendra Roy (The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, MoMA)

Costume Designer Extraordinaire Amanda Needham (Emmy-winning costume designer; Portlandia, Shrill)

Friday, March 13, 2020

PIFF 43 Closing Weekend centerpiece film First Cow

Directed by Kelly Reichardt

United States | 2020 | 121 mins

8:00 p.m. – Whitsell Auditorium

Returning to the Oregon wilderness for her seventh feature, Kelly Reichardt continues her examination of the American expansionist myth via the Western genre. John Magaro stars as a loner cook who teams up with a Chinese immigrant (Orion Lee) to create a new business—one
that is dependent on a wealthy landowner’s prize milk cow, but without his knowledge.
First Cow will open in Portland, Oregon, on Friday, March 20.

Trailer:

 

Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Personal History of David Copperfield

Directed by Armando Iannucci

United States | 2020 | 119 mins

6 p.m. – Cinema 21

The Personal History of David Copperfield re-imagines Charles Dickens’ classic ode to grit and perseverance through the comedic lens of its award-winning filmmakers—giving the Dickensian tale new life for a cosmopolitan age with a diverse ensemble cast of stage and screen actors from across the world. Emmy® winners and Oscar® nominees Armando Iannucci (In the Loop, The Death of Stalin, HBO’s Veep) and Simon Blackwell (In the Loop,
HBO’s Succession) lend their wry yet heart-filled storytelling style to revisiting Dickens’ iconic hero on his quirky journey from impoverished orphan to a burgeoning writer in Victorian England.

Photo by Geoff Robinson Photography/Shutterstock

 

March 14-16, 2020

Berio’s Sinfonia by Rose Bond | IN PARTNERSHIP WITH OREGON SYMPHONY

Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

Animator and Cinema Unbound Award honoree Rose Bond presents a program of eye-popping experiential animation set to and illustrating Luciano Bario’s monumental musical-cultural portrait of New York in the late 1960s. An incredible visual and sound experience for cinema-goers,
animators, experiential designers, and music lovers alike.

Tickets available to the March 14, 15 & 16 shows via Oregon Symphony.

PANELS AND WORKSHOPS

Over the course of the two weekends, PIFF will host eight panels, three workshops, and one special
un-conference.  PIFF will also host multi-day happy hour networking events with industry professionals to provide assistance and services to independent filmmakers. Date, Time and Location TBA.

Docs on the Rise — Cinema Unbound Award honoree Julie Goldman and Academy Award nominee and Portland documentary filmmaker Irene Taylor Brodsky discuss opportunities for expanded creativity in emerging marketplaces.

The Sustainability and Ethics Un-Conference — A participatory town hall about fostering an inclusive and ethically conscious media-making community, with breakout sessions on topics such as power dynamics on-set, setting contractual boundaries, and practicing empathy in production.

Beyond Cancel Culture — Cinema Unbound Award honoree
Rajendra Roy and curatorial colleagues discuss approaches to critically engaging with problematic narratives.

Interactive Media Performance by Reese Bowes

An evening of multi-format audio and visual experiences courtesy of guest curator Reese Bowes. who will also present two short film works by Portland-based filmmakers: Remembrance, by Sabina Haque, and Spooky Girls, by The Hand and The Shadow production company.

Date, Time and Location TBA.

Why I Love and Fear VR

Presented by Guest Curator, Cinema Unbound Award honoree, and Head of Venice Biennale XR Michel Reilhac

Date, time & location: TBA

Guest curator Gina Duncan (BAMcinématek) presents:

Prince’s Purple Rain (1984) date, time and Location: TBA

About the Northwest Film Center:

The Northwest Film Center is a regional media arts organization offering a variety of exhibitions, education programs, and artist services throughout the region. The Center presents a program of foreign, classic, experimental, and independent works year-round at the Whitsell Auditorium, located in
the Portland Art Museum. For more information, visit www.nwfilm.org.

About the Portland Art Museum

The seventh oldest museum in the United States, the Portland Art Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to its permanent collection.

The Museum’s campus of landmark buildings, a cornerstone of Portland’s cultural district, includes the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art, the Northwest Film Center, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art. With a membership of more than 22,000 households and serving more than 350,000 visitors annually, the Museum is a premier venue for education in the visual arts. For information on exhibitions and programs, call 503-226-2811 or visit portlandartmuseum.org.

The Portland Art Museum welcomes all visitors and affirms its commitment to making its programs and collections accessible to everyone. The Museum offers a variety of programs and services to ensure a quality experience and a safe, inclusive environment for every member of our diverse community. Learn more at portlandartmuseum.org/access.