Popular Portland Book Festival Turns Page and Plans to Go Online

Popular Portland Book Festival Turns Page and Plans to Go Online

Portland, OR. The Portland Book Festival will look different than the picture above this year. Book Lovers won’t be crowding in to hear from noted authors as in the past. The literary staple of the Pacific Northwest since 2005 is changing its long-standing event from in-person to entirely online. This news comes in the wake of the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic that has essentially curbed all social events and gatherings for the foreseeable future. Rather than canceling the annual festival scheduled for November, event organizers at Literary Arts say they want to continue community outreach during a time when people need it the most.

In years past, Portland Book Festival focuses on bringing families and the community together by offering their events for free and across many platforms.

Perhaps the most important change that Literary Arts has offered is to make the festival almost entirely free this year. This change comes during a time when many individuals may be uncertain about their financial stability and may not have been able to afford the previous cover charge for the event. Andrew Proctor, Executive Director of Literary Arts, says that this decision was made in order to better support the community during a national pandemic

Author readings will be viewable both live and backlogged for the attendee’s convenience.

Alongside the change in format, the festival will also be held across a fifteen-day span (Nov. 5-21) rather than staying as a single-day event. For this year’s attendees, that means that every seminar, class, and author reading can be accessed over the two week period, and often at their own leisure. It also means that the event becomes more accessible to everyone living here in Portland or anywhere else in the world. With formats ranging from podcasts, online blogs, and live streaming events, participants will have a range of options to suit their needs and limitations during these unprecedented times.

While things like book signings may not be available this year, online formats will still allow for attendees to interact with the festival’s many artists.

From Literary Arts:

To find out more about the upcoming 2020 Portland Book Festival, check out the Literary Arts website page on the event here. If you’d like to support a great organization, you can donate here.

 

De La Salle North Catholic HS Needs Funds to Build Gym on New School Campus

De La Salle North Catholic HS Needs Funds to Build Gym on New School Campus

Portland, OR. Students at De La Salle North Catholic High School (DLSNC) (pictured above before COVID-19) are excited about having a new facility. Since the launch of its Capital Campaign in March of 2019, DLSNC has raised $20.5 million to construct a new and more permanent school campus in the Cully Neighborhood of North Portland. However, the additional $3.65 million needed for a new gymnasium has not been raised. So far, DLSNC has raised $900,000 for the gymnasium, but time is of the essence because leaders will face a one million dollar price increase and the project will be delayed if the remaining $2.75 million for the gym is not raised by an August 3rd deadline.

Architectural rendering of De La Salle’s new school campus in North Portland.

“It’s not just about our students, it [the gym] will be apart of the Cully neighborhood, a place for after school sports and renting out the facility for youth sports on the weekend,” says Ashleigh de Villiers, VP for Advancement at De La Salle North Catholic High School.

Opened in 2001, De La Salle North Catholic High School serves a racially diverse population of students in the Portland area who typically do not have access to an affordable college preparatory education. De La Salle is the most diverse private high school in Oregon, with 93% of the student body being students of color. It also maintains an income cap that ensures students from low-income families can attend. Students cannot attend La Salle if their family makes more than 75% of the area’s median income. 

Each student works one day a week as a part of DLSNC’s Corporate Work Study, a program that partners with corporations, local businesses, and nonprofits to work with students one day a week. By working one day per week, each student earns half the cost of their tuition throughout the entire four years they attend. DLSNC maintains affordable tuition to ensure a quality education for underserved populations.

Currently, the school rents gym space for sports, but even without a proper on-campus gym, De La Salle’s men’s basketball team earned the 2018 and 2019 state championship title. The high school has made a total of six state appearances.

“The gym is special to us because our boys’ basketball team were the 2018 and 2019 state champions, and they did this without having a home gym,” says Ashleigh de Villiers.

After renting current elementary school building in Kenton from Portland Public Schools, DLSNC decided to pursue a more affordable and sustainable option. It has faced ever-increasing rent, with next year’s rental bill topping out at $480,000. After three years of searching, the school signed a new 50-year lease agreement co-locating with the Saint Charles Parish on 42nd and Killingsworth. The agreement includes two possible 25-year lease extensions which could result in a 100-year lease.

DLSNC hopes to have the new campus built by the Fall of 2021. It will include a visual arts center, science center, and welcoming campus, with the gymnasium being the final part of the facility. Construction is planned to begin at the end of July and will take 12 to 18 months. The new school campus will also allow the student population to increase from 280 to 350 students. Currently, 95% of graduating seniors are accepted to universities. 

Four graduating students, DLSNC Class of 2020

“To have a gym where we hang our banners and have our logo on the floor is something we really care about,” explains de Villiers,

From De La Salle North Catholic High School:

If you’re interested in donating to help build the new gym at De La Salle North Catholic High School, here’s a link: https://www.delasallenorth.org/apps/pages/donate

De La Salle North Catholic High School serves a racially diverse population of capable, motivated, and interested college-bound students from the Portland area who would not otherwise have access to a faith-based, rigorous college-preparatory education.

Here’s more information and some additional architectural renderings of De La Salle’s new school campus in North Portland:

NEW CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

  • State-of-the-Art Science Labs & Maker Space
  • Visual Arts Center
  • Indoor/Outdoor Commons Area 
  • Small, medium and large classrooms
  • Commercial Kitchen
  • High School Competition Gym and Weight Room
  • Administration and Corporate Work Study Offices
  • Guidance and College Counseling Center
  • Academic Resource Center

PROJECT TEAM

  • Shiels Obletz Johnsen Inc
  • Bora Architects
  • P&C Construction
  • The Varga Group
  • Stoel Rives 

 

CAMPAIGN STEERING COMMITTEE

  • Mary and Tim Boyle (Honorary Co-Chairs),
  • Jackie Dunckley,
  • Mark Ganz,
  • Kelly Hale,
  • Gay Jacobsen
  • Cyndy Maletis,
  • Patti O’Mara,
  • Matt Powell,
Latino Network Faces Increasing Need as it Gears Up for Annual Gala

Latino Network Faces Increasing Need as it Gears Up for Annual Gala

Portland, OR. The Latino Network is gearing up for its big annual gala, Noche Bella (Beautiful Night), which is set to take place on Sept. 25th at 7:00 p.m. Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the event will be held virtually. The picture seen above was taken at an event prior to the pandemic. 

“We’re really excited to virtualize everything,” said Latino Network Communication Manager Martina Bialek. “We have an auction, and our auction items are coming through, and we’re just really trying to get people excited to attend, whether it is from the comfort of their homes or elsewhere.” 

Normally, the event draws around 600 people and raises approximately $400,000 for the organization to fund programs, operations and administrative work, according to Bialek. 

The pandemic has forced the Latino Network to alter many of its regular operations; however, the organization has been busy offering as much support as possible to the communities it serves. Everything shifted to virtual operations on March 13th, and since then, school coordinators have found innovative ways to continue to offer the education and support that the organization regularly provides to students and families. 

“We’re basically an education focused non-profit, so, just from the sense of our programming, we’ve had to absolutely change everything, from the way that we interact with our students to how we show up for families who are in need right now,” Bialek said. 

Latino Network program participants at a pre-pandemic event

One innovative way the organization has adapted its communications is through Facebook groups. “We created Facebook groups and invited parents and started doing Facebook Live nighttime reading for students,” Bialek said. 

In terms of community assistance, the Latino Network has been working on the Covid-19 Response Team, which provides economic assistance to families, and also helps get them on the referral list for the Oregon Worker Relief Fund. 

Through this program, the Latino Network has been able to help families cover their basic needs, such as food, utilities and rent. 

Latino Network staff and program participants hosting standing food drive

“It has been a little challenging because we’ve reached the $10 million mark through the Oregon Worker Relief Fund, and we’re waiting for the second installment to come, which means that through that window, we’re not getting any new applications,” Bialek said. 

Until the Latino Network is able to secure the additional funds from the state, the organization is keeping busy connecting families to any type of utility assistance they can get based on their circumstances. 

“Being a nonprofit, it’s like we’re pulling money from all of our unrestricted funds, and all of our fundraising money, and we’re just putting it all towards helping the families,” Bialek said. “But we’ve reached a point where that’s just not a possibility at this point. So we’re getting other utilities involved and we’re really making sure that they can offer any type of assistance that they can to our families.” 

Bialek applauded the work of the staff at the Latino Network through this time, saying, “They’ve just been going above and beyond to really put families at the forefront of everything.” 

Throughout the pandemic, the Latino Network has also had many opportunities to work with other organizations: “Being able to work with other like minded community based organizations has been wonderful because we’ve been able to really tagteam all of our needs, and we were able to really expand on them,” Bialek said. “For example, we’ve been working really closely with the ACLU of Oregon, and we’ve really been able to create a partnership that is definitely going to last for years to come.” 

Bialek said that those interested in supporting the Latino Network can make a donation or elevate the work being done by the organization. 

“I feel like there is a big wave of change in the country, and the fact that our Black hermanos and hermanas are able to elevate their needs and are able to fight for what they need is wonderful,” Bialek said. 

“We’re no strangers to police brutality either, we’re no strangers to racial targeting, we’re no strangers to discrimination or racism, and on top of that we have a pandemic that has completely devastated our community in ways that we’re only scratching the surface of right now. So any visibility we can get, any support we can get helps, whether it’s economic or just sharing something on Twitter—just making sure that our struggle is seen and heard.”

About the Latino Network: 

Latino Network was founded in 1996 by community leaders who grew concerned about the lack of adequate resources to meet the needs of the growing Latino community. Since that time, we have evolved to become an organization that also encompasses transformational programs aimed at educating and empowering Multnomah County Latinos. Low achievement scores, youth violence and high drop out rates undermine the Latino community’s potential. We address these issues by promoting early literacy, encouraging parent involvement, working with gang-involved and adjudicated youth and families, and providing academic support and activities to high school aged youth. We also build leadership capacity for youth and adults.

United Way of the Columbia-Willamette Raises Over $600k for COVID-19 Relief Effort

United Way of the Columbia-Willamette Raises Over $600k for COVID-19 Relief Effort

Portland, OR. United Way of the Columbia-Willamette worked ahead of the curve to raise over $600,000 in response to the emerging needs due to the COVID-19 outbreak in the community. It began distributing the funds to needy people in April. “We have been overwhelmed with requests for assistance and receipt of in-kind goods,” noted Cindy Adams, President and CEO. “We have continued to leverage our strong partnerships with culturally responsive and culturally specific nonprofits in the community to distribute funding and in-kind goods to individuals and families who have been impacted the most by the pandemic.” Thanks to the help of its partners, United Way has continued to provide access to assistance in short-term housing, utilities, and access to food.

Here’s a video update from the organization:

The nonprofit focuses specifically on racial and ethnic equity by assisting local families and kid’s projects. Its programs include education-based projects aimed at increasing graduation rates for students of color, and financial assistance for healthcare and housing for families.

United Way (UW) staffer delivers in-kind donations to the Q Center in Portland.

The organization adapted quickly to an online business model, due to a previously in-place telecommuting policy that ensured resources and technology were available for the transition. United Way has done its best to navigate the lack of social contact, making the most of technology like Zoom, virtual cards, and phone calls.

LCSA_UW partner: Members of Labor’s Community Service Agency, a United Way nonprofit partner that received Safety Net funding in response to the pandemic, deliver food boxes to families in need.

As donations continue to come in during the nonprofit’s annual workplace campaign season, the organization will distribute the funds to partners assisting those in need as the community navigates the pandemic. Details of the distribution of funds to organizations can be found here.

Cindy Adams expects the needs of the community to continue to grow. She added, “United Way of the Columbia-Willamette is committed to helping our community transition from response to recovery and then rebuilding a community that is more resilient than ever before. We ask that our community, your readers, stay safe, be well, and think about how we can help those who are maybe less fortunate than ourselves.

From United Way of the Columbia-Willamette:

United Way of the Columbia-Willamette has been bringing our community together to do good for nearly 100 years.

We connect the people, nonprofits, businesses and government agencies addressing poverty in our region.

Our Mission:

Improve lives, strengthen communities and advance equity by mobilizing the caring power of people across our metro area.

We’re working hard to create a future where kids in our region are free from instability and worry so they can be free to play and discover, free to learn and grow.

Free from poverty. Free to reach their potential.

Right now, 20% of kids in the Portland region live in poverty and 1 in 3 families can’t pay for basic needs.

That’s 1 in 7 kids whose families must choose between:

• Rent or groceries
• Heat or healthcare
• New clothes or TriMet fare

Together, we can make our region a better place for everyone.

With your support, we can continue investing in our region’s schools, families and communities.

Schools for Kids 

  • More students are showing up prepared for the first day of kindergarten than ever before.
  • New preschool classrooms are being built, particularly addressing culturally-specific communities.
  • Graduation rates are increasing for students of color with the help of community partners.

Families for Kids

  • Families receive the assistance they need to help pay for basic needs like rent and food on the table.
  • Many families are staying housed one year after receiving service.
  • With free tax services from our partners, working families are receiving important tax credits to remain financially stable.

Communities for Kids 

  • Through Hands on Greater Portland, United Way’s volunteer program, thousands of volunteers are connected to meaningful projects being held throughout our region.
  • The value of service from our volunteers equates to hundreds of thousands of dollars put back into the community.
  • Hundreds of local organizations are receiving service from our volunteers.

When we understand the causes of poverty in our region, we have a better chance of finding solutions. By partnering with local organizations and providing opportunities to convene and mobilize, United Way can address the different areas of need in our community and find strategies that will create the strongest impact.

Community Warehouse Raises Record Amount at Annual Gala “Chair Affair”

Community Warehouse Raises Record Amount at Annual Gala “Chair Affair”

Portland, OR. Community Warehouse raised a record $200,687 at its annual gala, “Chair Affair,” which was held on June 26th. The event was held virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Chair Affair 2020 was “a virtual affair to remember,” according to Community Warehouse Communications Manager Pua Trice, and featured “unique art, exciting auctions, and inspiring stories from people whose houses have been transformed into homes.” 

“The event raised a record-setting net of $200,687 that will connect essential furnishings to neighbors in need throughout the region,” Trice said. Dale Johannes and Dunethcka Otero-Serrano, Community Warehouse’s Executive Director hosted the event, as shown in the photo above. “I want to start tonight’s Chair Affair with gratitude,” Otero-Serrano said. “These past few months have been so challenging for all of us, but we have been able to get creative and continue service to our community because of our partners.” 

Children’s Chairs created by local artists and sponsored by wonderful supporters of Community Warehouse. These chairs go to children of families that visit the Warehouse in need of furnishings.

“These past few months have certainly been challenging,” Johannes said, “but your team of superheroes—and they are superheroes—they’ve been hard at work adapting to this change and creating some new ways to meet the needs of the community.” 

The hosts emphasized how important a table or a bed can be throughout Covid-19’s disruptions to daily life, and that Community Warehouse has continued to serve their clients throughout the pandemic by supplying them with Home2Go essential item kits.  

“These are kits that are essential items for every household, designed to give our clients an opportunity to cook their own meals, to have a safe place to sleep, a full set of dishes, and a full set of towels and bedsheets,” said Community Warehouse Program Director Joe Glode in a video.

Stories from various partners, volunteers and clients were spotlighted at the event. Partners like the Tigard-Tualatin School District detailed the impact that essential furnishings have on their students’ capabilities in the classroom, and Youth volunteers highlighted their understanding and proactivity towards Community Warehouse’s mission.

Matthew Mickles, Ben Garcia, and Priscilla Villanueva from the Tigard-Tualatin School District

“Well-being was encapsulated by the Espinoza family,” Trice said, “clients that can enjoy ‘family day’ in a warm and welcoming home.”

The Espinoza Family—Amelia, Alexander, Ailani, Steve, Sandra, and Sandy

According to Glode, at the beginning of the pandemic in March, Community Warehouse had to temporarily lay off most of its staff. “When city and state officials issued a stay at home order, we really were thinking, how do you stay at home if you have nothing at home?” Glode said. 

That’s when Community Warehouse decided to start making essential item kits—called Home2Go kits—with items they had readily available in both their Portland and Tualitan warehouses. 

Since March, Community Warehouse has been able to bring nearly all of their staff back to work in some capacity, and the organization is continuing to focus on providing their services to the Portland community. 

“It means a lot to know that we have the support of everyone in the community to make sure that we can provide furniture in a safe place to live for everyone,” Glode said.

Joe Glode, Program Director at Community Warehouse, preparing a Home2Go Essential Item Kit.

About Community Warehouse:

We’re your friendly local furniture bank, serving the Portland area for over 15 years. How does a furniture bank work? In a nutshell, we collect donated home goods, and work with social service agencies to get those goods in the hands of those who need it most. The stuff you no longer need becomes the solution for a family in need. Pretty simple, huh? At Community Warehouse, it’s the simple stuff – the extra dishes, towels, beds, and more – that changes lives.

Autism Society of Oregon to Livestream Upcoming Autism Walk

Autism Society of Oregon to Livestream Upcoming Autism Walk

Portland, Or. Last summer walkers hit the streets together for the annual Autism Walk, but this year’s fundraiser will be a virtual live-streamed event, according to the Autism Society of Oregon. The free event, for which participants can register online, will be held online at 1 P.M. on Sunday, August 23rd. “Patterns and routines help to make sense of the world for people on the autism spectrum – they’re incredibly important. When those patterns are disrupted, it completely disrupts everything.” Executive Director Tobi Rates provided some insight into life on the spectrum, noting the impact that the disruptions to school, work, and service provisions have had on people experiencing autism: “It’s been traumatic for a lot of people, and it’s an ongoing trauma because it doesn’t look like things are going back to normal anytime soon.”

Participants in this year’s Autism Walk can send videos and photos to ASO by July 14th

Those registered can send in videos and photos of themselves walking or running in their Autism Awareness/ Acceptance T-shirt by July 14th. These will then be featured during the virtual event in a compilation video. Viewers can expect recognitions and prize-giveaways for sponsors, as well as guest appearances from Star Wars characters and a Virtual Resource Fair.

Here is a video encapsulating the details of the event:

Adapting the Autism Walk – ASO’s largest fundraiser supporting Oregon and SW Washington programs – to a virtual setting is one of the many ways the organization has been able to maintain a sense of routine for its members during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Participants in last year’s walk sporting their awareness gear

Max’s support system celebrating at last year’s finish line

Whether participants choose to walk or run in this year’s event, they can expect the fun to be virtually limitless.

From Autism Society Oregon (ASO);

ASO will be Oregon’s leading organization providing resources, education, advocacy and support for individuals and families living with Autism.
Our Mission

Improving the lives of all affected by autism.

ASO is committed to achieving our vision through the following strategies:

• Education
• Support
• Resources
• Advocacy
• Collaboration
• Awareness
Our Values
At all times ASO builds community in a way that is ethical, respectful, safe, inclusive and welcomes all perspectives.

 

The Pixie Project Continues Helping Animals During Pandemic

The Pixie Project Continues Helping Animals During Pandemic

Portland, OR. With most people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, pet companionship has become more important to many. Whether you’re in need of a new furry friend or are seeking veterinary care for your pet, the nonprofit Pixie Project is continuing to offer services. The organization has maintained community outreach despite the difficulties of staying afloat during this unprecedented time. By focusing on one-on-one appointment-only interactions, staffers are able to bring potential pets directly to people’s homes to meet for the first time.

Jessica Berg, Development Director, says they’ve recently performed about 20 feline surgeries in only 2 days.

The Pixie Project, located at 510 N.E. MLK Blvd., is a small nonprofit animal adoption and rescue center. It differs from many other local centers by not only offering pet adoption with a focus on establishing life-long homes for animals but also by offering medical attention to pet-owners who cannot shoulder the financial burden required of surgery such as spaying and neutering or more serious health concerns for animals.

The Pixie Project offers a “sliding scale” payment practice for medical attention in order to ease the financial burden on struggling pet-owners.

Jessica Berg, the Pixie Project’s Development Director, says that adoption rates are still fairly high while donations have taken a hit. The steady adoption rates should be no surprise considering the need for companionship during the stay-at-home orders. Most of the organization’s funding comes from coordinated fundraising events which have all but stopped during this time of social distancing.

Pixie Project supporters say there’s nothing more valuable during these isolating times than a happy and healthy companion.

From: Pixie Project

If you’d like to find out more about the Pixie Project, donate to a good cause, or if you’re in need of pet care services, check out the Pixie Project website here or its donation page here.

Neighborhood Heroes Campaign Provides 300 Overnight Stays for Oregon Families

Neighborhood Heroes Campaign Provides 300 Overnight Stays for Oregon Families

Portland, OR. “Small actions can have a big impact,” said Lilly K.H. McFadden, Director of Programs & Community Engagement for Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC). Participants (like the superhero shown above) were raising money from home for the nonprofit. May 13th marked RMHC’s first Neighborhood Heroes Campaign. By encouraging communities throughout Oregon to partake in various events from home, the campaign raised enough money to provide 300 overnight stays at the Ronald McDonald Houses for families living in rural Oregon in need of housing near hospitals for their sick or injured child.

A Volunteer wears cape for Week 1 rally.

A family works on fundraising by celebrating their favorite superheroes.

After receiving inquiries from locals asking how they could contribute to the foundation, Ronald McDonald Charity Houses created the Neighborhood Heroes Campaign to engage the local community and fundraise for the cost of the stays, always free of charge to the impacted families but averaging about $115 to $200 per night for the Ronald McDonald House.

Previous guests, board members, and volunteers reached out to friends, family, and coworkers to recruit volunteers and participate in weekly themed events from their home. 

“We want to offer a fun opportunity for people to become the hero they want to be,” said McFadden.

Week 1 consisted of families and individuals dressing up in their favorite superhero costumes or favorite capes. McDonald’s hosted week 3’s “Neighborhood” theme by encouraging others to help their local neighbor, whether it be by picking up trash or mowing someone else’s lawn. One HR Company even hosted a dance competition. 

While COVID-19 social distancing guidelines have placed restrictions on rallying and fundraising gatherings, locals were able to show their support from home and through social media.

Additionally, Netrush, an online retailer, gave a $10,000 corporate sponsorship to continue the campaign for one more week. 

The Neighborhood Heroes Campaign ended on June 17th. Due to its success, the campaign will happen again next year. “We were honored to help the community step up and step in for our families, and have fun while doing it,” said Lilly K.H. McFadden, Director of Programs & Community Engagement.

From its first house in 1984 by OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospital for Children, the Ronald McDonald House Charities in Oregon and SW Washington are placed in close proximity to hospitals, helping impacted families with sick children easily reach their medical center in Portland, Bend, and Springfield. Ronald McDonald’s House Charities are in four different locations; Portland East House, Bend House, South Waterfront House, and Springfield House. Each house has 79 rooms, equipped with a fully stocked kitchen and beds. 

From Ronald McDonald House Charities (Oregon & SW Washington):

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oregon & SW Washington provides access to medical care, a home away from home, and a community of support for seriously ill or injured children and their families.

Portland Art Museum Commemorates 40th Anniversary of Mount St. Helen’s Eruption

Portland Art Museum Commemorates 40th Anniversary of Mount St. Helen’s Eruption

Portland, Or. To mark the 40th anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the Portland Art Museum is presenting an exhibition that portrays artists’ responses to the beauty and power of the volcano. The exhibition will run through May 17th at the Portland Art Museum. Pictured above is Lucinda Parker’s painting called “The Seething Saint.” (Courtesy of the artist and Russo Lee Gallery.) The exhibit features Native American objects to contemporary paintings, drawings, and photographs. Interestingly, paintings of Mount St. Helens were historically rare compared with the numerous images of Mount Hood.

Albert Bierstadt (American, born Germany, 1830-1902), Mount St. Helens, Columbia River, Oregon, ca. 1889. Oil on canvas.

Henk Pander (American, born The Netherlands, 1937), Eruption of Saint Helens from Cable Street, 1981. Oil on linen.

The show will also trace the mountain’s changing image and significance for local peoples. Native Americans used the substance of the volcano—mainly basalt and obsidian—to create objects of great beauty and utility. While Mount St. Helens was featured in their creation stories, no depictions of the volcano in visual arts are known before the mid-1840s. Explorers Henry James Warre and Paul Kane traveled through the area and their visits ended up coinciding with the volcano’s last eruptive period and they recorded the venting of steam and ash on the north side, presaging its destruction on May 18, 1980. Volcanic eruptions have long been depicted by artists because they are the most visually spectacular manifestations of nature’s awesome power.

As the region commemorates the 40th anniversary of the volcano’s eruption, the Portland Art Museum is partnering with the Mount St. Helens Institute on a series of programs, tours, and in-gallery experiences throughout the run of the exhibition. For those who remember the eruption of 1980 and for those who know its legacy, the exhibition will bring to life one of the most momentous days in the history of the Pacific Northwest, and artists’ responses to one short period in the cycles of volcanic destruction and regeneration at Mount St. Helens.

Emmet Gowin (American, born 1941), Debris Flow at the Northern Base of Mount St. Helens, Looking South, 1983, gelatin silver print, © Emmet Gowin, Courtesy of Pace/MacGill, New York.

Mathias Van Hesemans (American, born 1946), Eruption, 1983, Mount Saint Helens, 1983. Gelatin silver print.

Below is a video of what the Portland Art Museum has in store for 2020:

More from the Portland Art Museum:

The mission of the Portland Art Museum is to engage diverse communities through art and film of enduring quality, and to collect, preserve, and educate for the enrichment of present and future generations. The Portland Art Museum strives to be an inclusive institution that facilitates respectful dialogue, debate, and the free exchange of ideas.  With a deep commitment to artists – past and present – and freedom of expression, the Museum and Northwest Film Center’s collections, programs and staff aspire to reveal the beauty and complexities of the world and create a deeper understanding of our shared humanity.  We are a Museum for all, inviting everyone to connect with art through their own experiences, voices, and personal journeys.  The following core values guide the Portland Art Museum: creativity, connection, learning, accessibility, accountability.

Adventist Health Unites Communities in Annual Celebration of Thanksgiving Concert

Adventist Health Unites Communities in Annual Celebration of Thanksgiving Concert

Portland, OR. Nearly 2,000 people filled New Hope Church in Happy Valley, Oregon, on November 23rd. The community came together for a free concert supporting local community aid organizations. Adventist Health Portland presented its annual Celebration of Thanksgiving concert as an expression of gratitude for the community’s faith and support.  Adventist Health Portland includes Adventist Health Portland Medical Center in southeast Portland, a nonprofit, 302-bed acute care facility, offering a full range of inpatient, outpatient and emergency services throughout the Portland/Vancouver metropolitan area. Clinically integrated with OHSU, Adventist Health Medical Group represents more than 100 primary care and specialty physicians who treat and admit their patients to Adventist Medical Center. Pictured above are people sorting out the generous food donations.

Dr. Terry Johnsson

Matt Maher performs for the crowd

The event opened with performances by a praise band made up of Adventist Health employees, including Joyce Newmyer, Adventist Health Pacific Northwest Region president. Headliner and contemporary Christian artist Matt Maher took the stage, Maher has written and produced nine solo albums and penned many well-known praise and worship songs.

People enjoying the concert

Joyce Newmyer, president of Adventist Health, shares a message of thanks with guests at the 11th annual Celebration of Thanksgiving concert.

Collecting socks for Portland Rescue Mission

Young folks donating food

This year’s guests contributed 1,900 pounds of food for Portland Adventist Community Services (PACS) and more than 3,000 pairs of socks for the Portland Rescue Mission in place of admission for the concert. The celebration of Thanksgiving has raised more than 12 tons of nonperishable food donations since its inception in 2009. More than 10,000 pairs of socks have been donated since this emphasis was added in 2016. Previous performers include Phillips, Craig and Dean; Point of Grace; Rebecca St. James; Selah; and Sandi Patty.

From Adventist Health:

Adventist Health services in Portland are part of Adventist Health a faith-based, nonprofit integrated health system serving more than 75 communities on the West Coast and Hawaii. Our compassionate and talented team of 33,300 includes more than 24,600 employees; 5,000 medical staff physicians; and 3,700 volunteers working together in pursuit of one mission: living God’s love by inspiring health, wholeness, and hope. Founded on Seventh-day Adventist heritage and values, Adventist Health provides care in 19 hospitals, more than 280 clinics (hospital-based, rural health and physician clinics), 13 home care agencies, seven hospice agencies, and four joint-venture retirement centers.

From The Portland Rescue Mission:

The Portland Rescue Mission has had a tireless commitment to breaking the cycle of homelessness, addiction and despair in the lives of hurting people in need. We offer emergency services of food and shelter at our original downtown location at the Burnside Shelter. And we’ve expanded those services to include 24/7 restrooms, showers, clothing, mail service, referrals and community activities in the Guest Care Center.Thanks to generous community support, we’ve expanded our ministry to include a wide range of programs designed to meet a hurting person at their point of need and help them toward their journey home. This includes our 3-month Connect program for men and women, and our New Life Ministries for men and women at The Harbor and Shepherd’s Door, respectively. Portland Rescue Mission also includes our Drive Away Hunger car sales and donations program and Mission Bar-B-Que catering. Proceeds support all of our programs to give hope and restore life to hurting people.

 

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