Oregon Golf Association Sees Uptick in Play During COVID-19

Oregon Golf Association Sees Uptick in Play During COVID-19

Woodburn, OR. “We have definitely seen an uptick on rounds of golf played since the pandemic began,” says Chief Executive Officer of the nonprofit Oregon Golf Association, Barb Trammell. “The OGA Golf Course here in Woodburn – which is home to our offices – has certainly experienced a surge in rounds. Our rounds this year are approximately 20% higher than the average of the past 3 years.” And some tournaments are still being played, like the Oregon Amateur Championship.

Bryce Wortman, Lara Tennant and Amanda Jacobs are crowned champions at the Oregon Amateur Championship on June 25th at Columbia Edgewater Country Club.

“Here in Oregon, we were fortunate that golf remained open when all non-essential businesses were shuttered. I think the fact that golf is an activity that can easily be played with social distancing and is outside attracted a lot of first-timers as well as turned those who maybe played only a handful of times into avid players,” Trammell explains.

The Oregon Golf Association (OGA) is a 501(c)(6) non-profit membership association. Founded in 1924, the OGA was originally established with the sole purpose of conducting the Oregon Amateur Championship. Since its founding more than 90 years ago, the OGA works tirelessly to promote, foster, and grow the game of golf providing a multitude of benefits and services to approximately 41,000 individual men, women, senior, and junior members at more than 400 member golf clubs throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.
Oregon Symphony Cancels All Concerts Scheduled Through December 2020

Oregon Symphony Cancels All Concerts Scheduled Through December 2020

Portland, OR. You won’t see the Oregon Symphony tuning up (like the photo above) anytime soon. Oregon Symphony is canceling of all concerts through December 31st, 2020 due to the effects of COVID-19, affecting Portland and Salem performances. “We are deeply disappointed that we will not be performing the exciting lineup of live concerts we had planned for the beginning of the new 2020-21 season, but our primary concern is the health and safety of our audiences, musicians and employees,” says Scott Showalter, Oregon Symphony President and CEO. The decision which was announced on July 8th comes after evaluating the guidance and information shared by Gov. Brown and state health officials in regard to large gatherings of people in public spaces.

Oregon Symphony plans to resume live performances in January, maintaining the current 2021 concert schedule and will share updates as necessary. “In my 18th and final season as Music Director, I look forward to returning to the stage with our excellent Oregon Symphony musicians next year, when we can once again do what we love to do — play for our amazing community,” says Carlos Kalmar, Oregon Symphony Music Director.

In consideration of the cancelations, Oregon Symphony will continue to share recordings of past performances online, along with new musical video content featuring Oregon Symphony musicians. This June, Oregon Symphony launched two new digital series, each continuing to premiere free content: Essential Sounds and Symphony Storytime. Through these original series, Oregon Symphony continues to stay connected with their community, and share the healing power and joy of music.

Essential Sounds is a multifaceted digital program that pays an all-new musical tribute to the organizations, groups, sectors and individuals holding communities together across the nation during the pandemic. The series includes rich performances, revealing interviews and lighthearted interludes, produced across six episodes to honor frontline and essential workers who have worked tirelessly during the tragic impact of COVID-19. The first two episodes are available online now — honoring healthcare and food service workers, respectively — with the third premiering on July 12 in dedication to social services. The series airs every other Sunday at orsymphony.org/essential.

Symphony Storytime is a 13-episode digital video series designed for pre-K through elementary aged children and their families to experience popular illustrated storybooks. Each episode is entertaining and educational, and includes a great children’s story narrated by a master storyteller, with accompaniment by an Oregon Symphony musician or guest artist performing the book’s “soundtrack.” Families will learn fun details about the featured instrument, and books are in English and Spanish languages. There are nine 15-minute episodes available online now, with the final anthology released July 9, 2020.

“Thanks to the incredible support from our community, the Oregon Symphony has been a leader of the arts in Oregon for nearly 125 years,” says Showalter. “We look forward to returning in January with a variety of extraordinary concerts for the 2020-21 season, including An African American Requiem, a world premiere of Portland composer Damien Geter’s bold musical response to violence against African Americans; the continuation of our popular Kids Series, featuring entertaining and educational concerts for families; and Carlos Kalmar’s final concert conducting the Oregon Symphony, with the performance of Mahler’s colossal Symphony No. 9.”

For Ticket Holders

For tickets already purchased to canceled concerts, patrons can find information about donating the value of unused tickets, applying ticket value to a concert that has not been canceled, exchanging tickets for gift certificates or obtaining refunds for the canceled concerts by contacting Oregon Symphony Customer Service at 503-228-1353 or [email protected]. Patrons holding a subscription that includes canceled concerts can also apply the value of their ticket(s) to a 2021-22 season subscription, and secure the same seat locations. Those who are in the position to do so are encouraged to make an additional gift to support the Oregon Symphony online at orsymphony.org/support-us/give.

About Oregon Symphony

The multi-Grammy Award-nominated Oregon Symphony ranks as one of America’s major orchestras. Led by Music Director Carlos Kalmar, it serves more than 235,000 people annually through concerts and award-winning education and community engagement programs. The Oregon Symphony has broken attendance and fundraising records in recent years, while innovating on stage through new series such as SoundSights, Sounds of Home and SoundStories. As 2019-20 marks its 123rd season, the Oregon Symphony is the oldest orchestra in the western United States. For more information, visit www.orsymphony.org.

Follow Oregon Symphony on Instagram @OregonSymphony and Facebook @OregonSymphony.

 

Contact Information:

Allyson Marrs

Grady Britton

[email protected]

541-844-4688

Portlanders Head Outdoors to Newly Reopened Attractions

Portlanders Head Outdoors to Newly Reopened Attractions

Portland, OR. Visitors are flocking to Portland area attractions like the International Rose Test Garden in Washington Park. As of June 25th, to prevent the spread of COVID-19, face masks are required within indoor spaces and many people are still opting for masks in busy parks. Portland Parks & Recreation is reopening spaces as allowed by Oregon Health Authority. Visitors are still required, under the Stay Home, Stay Safe order, to maintain 6 feet of physical distance between others and not assemble in groups larger than 10 people at any park. Concerts in the Park, Movies in the Park, Washington Park Summer Festival, and Portland World Soccer Tournament are canceled this summer. But there are still appealing options.

Rose Garden hours are from 7:30 A.M.-9:00 P.M

Here’s a list of what’s open in Portland parks:

Portland Park ASSET   STATUS
Archery range Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open
Athletic/sport fields Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed
Basketball courts Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed
Boat launch/docks Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10.
Community centers (including arts centers, pools, and recreation activities) Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – All PP&R recreation activities are canceled through through September 2020. This date is subject to change. For refund information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/756846.
Community gardens Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10. For more information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/757553.
Concerts/Movies in the Park Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – Concerts in the Park, Movies in the Park, Washington Park Summer Festival, and Portland World Soccer Tournament are canceled this summer. For more information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/759204.
Disc Golf Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10; do not share discs.
Dog off-leash areas Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10.
Drinking fountains Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open
Fitness equipment Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed
Fountains (interactive and decorative) Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – Interactive fountains and decorative fountains will remain off throughout the summer. Drinking fountains are open.
Free Lunch + Play  Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – Portland Parks & Recreation is planning to operate our Free Lunch + Play program this summer. Access to nutritious food has proven to be one of the highest needs in our community during this public health crisis. Please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/lunch.
Golf Courses Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Open – clubhouses are closed, except for restrooms. Food and beverage are limited and available for take-out only. For more information, visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/63560.
Parking areas and roads Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Most parking areas, park roads, and gates are closed to help reduce crowding. See list below for details.
Permits/rentals (indoor facilities)  Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – canceled through September 2020. This date is subject to change. For refund information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/756846.
Permits/rentals (outdoor facilities) Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Permitted picnics and weddings with 25 or fewer people approved when Multnomah County enters Phase I – estimated on June 12, 2020. This date is subject to change.
Pick-up and organized sport games Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed
Picnic sites Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10.
Playgrounds and play areas Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed
Pools Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – All PP&R recreation activities are canceled through through September 2020. This date is subject to change. For refund information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/756846.
Poet’s Beach and River Swimming Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10. Please be aware of water safety and information on posted signage. There are no lifeguards present. More information is available at portlandoregon.gov/parks/73880. Entering the water is not allowed at Kelley Point Park.
Public gardens Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Most are open; however, gardens operated by our partners or third parties may be closed. Please call your destination before visiting.
Restrooms Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – cleaned once per day
Skateparks Green check mark to signify an asset is open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10.
Tennis courts (outdoor) Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Open – No groups. Singles only. Each player must bring their own marked tennis balls. The Portland Tennis Center remains closed alongside our community centers. Read more at portlandoregon.gov/parks/52167.
Trails and natural areas Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Open – stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10. Some sites have one-way trail markers.
Splash pads Red letter X to signify an asset is closed. Closed – Splash pads and interactive fountains will remain off throughout the summer.
Weddings/ceremonies Yellow exclamation point signifying an asset is partially open Weddings with 25 or fewer people approved when Multnomah County enters Phase I – estimated on June 12, 2020. This date is subject to change.

Outdoor tennis courts are open at Willamette Park in SW Portland.

Dog off-leash areas are open, but visitors must stay 6 feet apart; no groups above 10.

Some private nonprofit parks, like the Japanese Garden, require face masks for indoor activities.

Among the new safety adjustments are timed entry admissions, one-way routes through the Garden, and limiting the number of people in spaces.

Multnomah County has provided educational materials to remind park-goers of safety tips.

SUMMER FREE FOR ALL
Portland Parks & Recreation is operating the Free Lunch + Play program this summer, which started on Monday, June 22nd. Access to nutritious food has proven to be one of the highest needs in our community during this public health crisis. PP&R and our partners will play an important role in keeping kids healthy this summer. For more information, please visit portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/759204.


HOW TO STAY SAFE
Portland Parks & Recreation has monitored the COVID-19 situation since it began. We continue to be in communication with, and to follow the guidance of, the Oregon Health AuthorityMultnomah County Health Department, and the Portland Bureau of Emergency Management regarding the situation.

  • People who are exhibiting symptoms of any illness should stay home and refrain from using any PP&R facility.
  • Follow CDC guidelines and wash your hands before and after you visit a park, trail, or natural area, or any other public space.
  • Follow CDC physical distancing recommendations and keep 6 feet from others at all times, including interacting with other park visitors and PP&R staff. If you can’t maintain that distance, find another location or come back another time.
  • Be prepared for limited access to public restrooms and no operating water fountains.
  • While on trails, announce your presence to others and step aside to let others pass.

Our community’s parks system provides our neighbors with many opportunities to improve their mental and physical health during this public health emergency. However, please understand that we will need the assistance and compliance of the entire community with these actions. Let’s work together to slow the spread of this virus and save lives. 

For any other City info related to COVID-19, please visit https://beta.portland.gov/novel-coronavirus-covid-19.


HOW YOU CAN HELP
PP&R suggests that people who feel sick with cold or flu symptoms should stay home and avoid contact with others. If you have health concerns or questions, please contact your regular doctor. Everyone must take steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19, especially to protect those who are more vulnerable. The Oregon Health Authority also recommends the following steps you can take to prevent the spread of flu, the common cold, and COVID-19:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  2. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  3. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  4. Stay home while you are sick and avoid close contact with others.
  5. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough into your elbow.
  6. Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that you frequently touch.
  7. If you are traveling overseas, check for the latest COVID-19 Travel Alerts and follow the CDC’s Travelers’ Health guidance: guidance at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel.

Stay informed about the virus
Please check the following resources below for updates about COVID-19 in Oregon and Multnomah County. For additional resources, call 211.

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Multnomah County Health Department
multco.us/novel-coronavirus-covid-19

Oregon Health Authority
oregon.gov/oha/ph/diseasesconditions/diseasesaz/Pages/emerging-respiratory-infections.aspx

World Health Organization
who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019


Discrimination, stigma and COVID-19
Please see important information from Multnomah County on preventing discrimination and stigma related to COVID-19 by following multco.us/novel-coronavirus-covid-19/discrimination-stigma-and-covid-19.


COVID-19 Information – Cancellations and Refunds
portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/756846

St. Andrew Nativity School Students Organize Peaceful Protest in Honor of Black Lives Matter

St. Andrew Nativity School Students Organize Peaceful Protest in Honor of Black Lives Matter

Portland, OR. Students from St. Andrew Nativity School are organizing a peaceful protest on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21st. Students will march in support of Black Lives Matter from their school at 4925 NE 9th Ave to a local police precinct. The protest will begin at 2 P.M. and masks are required. Students say they’re are marching on Father’s Day to honor the fathers who have been killed due to police brutality.

St. Andrew Nativity School is a tuition-free private middle school serving students and families from low-income backgrounds in NE Portland. The peaceful protest is aimed at raising awareness about the death of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and the many others who have been affected by racism and police brutality in America.

St. Andrew Nativity School is a Catholic and Jesuit middle school dedicated to offering an academically challenging curriculum in a highly structured environment students of all faiths.

From St. Andrew Nativity School:

Students from Nativity School are organizing this protest in honor of the many Black lives who are fighting for freedom and the safety of the next generation. Please join us in the fight for freedom and equality.

 St. Andrew Nativity School is Oregon’s only tuition-free, private middle school for low-income students. Located in NE Portland, just off 9th and Alberta, Nativity School offers a challenging academic program that prepares students for college preparatory high schools. 92% of Nativity School students go on to graduate from high school and 88% go on to attend college.

 

June is Second Most Popular Month for Charitable Giving

June is Second Most Popular Month for Charitable Giving

In 2018, overall charitable giving in the United States increased by 1.5% on a year-over-year basis. Large organizations grew by 2.3%; medium organizations increased 2%; and small nonprofits experienced a decrease of 2.3% compared to the same time period in 2017. Since 2016, overall giving has grown 9% and giving to Foundations grew 5% over the same three year time period.

Online giving grew 1.2% in 2018 compared to 2017. Large organizations had a decrease of 0.5%; medium-sized organizations grew 3.7%; and small nonprofits grew 0.7% on a year-over-year basis. Since 2016, online giving has grown 17%, and average online gift amounts have continued to increase. The percentage of total fundraising that came from online giving once again reached another record high in 2018. Approximately 8.5% of overall fundraising revenue, excluding grants, was raised online. In 2018, 24% of online transactions were made using a mobile device.

This is the continuation of a growing trend we have measured over many years now. Arts and Culture organizations had the largest growth in both overall and online giving during 2018. Animal Welfare, International Affairs, Higher Education, and Public and Society Benefit organizations also experienced significant growth in overall giving compared to 2017. Public and Society Benefit, Healthcare, and Faith Communities also had growth in online giving in 2018. 2018 continued the longest sustained period of charitable giving growth since the last recession.

There are several key trends shaping charitable giving that are highlighted here. First, charitable giving in the United States is returning to normal levels following two years of significant growth. Second, online giving is entering a new phase where mobile and other digital channels continue to change how donors engage with nonprofit organizations. Finally, giving to Foundations and Donor Advised Funds (DAFs) continues to grow in response to supporter preferences and changes in incentives. A 36-month view of fundraising from the same organizations reveals a 9% growth in overall giving and a 17% increase in online giving. When we take a broader view, spikes in giving during 2017 gave way to more normal growth rates in 2018. There is a tendency to want to identify a single reason for shifts in giving, but that is not how the philanthropic ecosystem works.

The digital marketing firm for nonprofits, Blackbaud, released this finding in its 2018 Charitable Giving Report.

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