History-Making Dougy Center Benefit & Porsche Boxster Raffle Raises Over $900,000

History-Making Dougy Center Benefit & Porsche Boxster Raffle Raises Over $900,000

Portland, OR. Over 550 community members gathered at the Portland Art Museum to support The Dougy Center at the 2018 Reflection Benefit & Auction presented by KinderCare Education. This year’s Reflection Benefit on May 11th raised over $900,000, which is more than any other event in The Dougy Center’s history. This night included a silent auction featuring one-of-a-kind art created by Dougy Center participating children and teens, an elegant dinner, a live auction, and a heartfelt testimonial from Alissa, Robbie, Madeline and Samantha Parker, a family who participates in The Dougy Center’s program which supports grieving children and families. (Photo credit, Ilona LaRue)

Kevin and Jessica Sailor

Daphne and Destiny, Dougy Center Participants, displaying their art in the silent auction

Jeff Gianola, Emcee and Johnna Wells, Auctioneer

The inspiring evening culminated with the announcement of the 21st Annual Porsche Boxster Raffle winner, which nearly sold out of all 2,000 tickets.

The Dougy Center 2018 Reflection Benefit and Raffle was Co-Chaired by Tim & Jennifer O’Brien and Michael & Brandy Horwitz, and raised over $900,000 for our program to support children, teens, young adults and their families grieving the death of a loved one, or those living with a family member with an advanced serious illness.

Albertina Kerr Luncheon Highlights New Energy

Albertina Kerr Luncheon Highlights New Energy

Portland, OR. The annual Albertina Kerr  luncheon introduced community members to the work of the local nonprofit, which provides programs and services to children and adults with developmental disabilities and mental health challenges, empowering them to live richer lives. The event on November 3rd at the Downtown Portland Hilton drew approximately 350 people. Bernie Wilson, Dir. of DDS and Sandra Cisneros, Family Support Specialist posed for a photo. (Photo credit, Andie Petkus)

Anne Adler – CDO, Jeff Carr = CEO, Kristie Nelson and son Nathan – client of Kerr, Jennifer Harmon – Marketing and Communications Mgr.

Discover Kerr was a free luncheon with a presentation from CEO, Jeff Carr. Carr also identified the long-term goals of the organization: build affordable on-site housing for employees, revitalize the brand, cultivate strategic community partnerships and invest in the services they provide.

Chris Krenke and Jeff Carr – Past and Present CEOs of Albertina Kerr

Connie West – Joyce Manougian Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, Jeff Carr – CEO, Miki Herman – Chair, Foundation Trustees

From Albertina Kerr:

Our Mission

Albertina Kerr empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health challenges and other social barriers to lead self-determined lives and reach their full potential.

​Our Vision

​​​All people thrive in nurturing and inclusive communities.

Our Values

Guiding beliefs that shape the culture of Albertina Kerr Centers, the behavior of all individuals directly associated with the organization, and the delivery of services include:

DIGNITY AND COMPASSION

Every individual has equal value and we treat each person served with dignity and respect. Our belief in kindness, understanding, humanity, and the value of diversity and culturally appropriate services guides our daily work.

INTEGRITY

We are committed to high ethical standards. Honesty, accountability and responsible stewardship of financial resources are expected from all employees and volunteers.

COMMITMENT

We are committed in providing the best care possible for everyone we serve. We believe in evidence-based practices, continuous learning and improvement to ensure positive service outcomes and responsible financial management. We are forward-thinking in our work and seek out innovative and creative approaches to fulfilling community needs.

COLLABORATION

We partner with the people we serve and their families to achieve our vision and mission. Partnerships with employees, community volunteers and donors, government agencies and other like-minded organizations are also essential.

ADVOCACY

We strongly advocate for the needs of the people we serve, educating the community and political decision makers about the challenges they face. We employ those we serve to successfully advocate for their own needs and rights.

Portland Children’s Museum Proud to Present Hannah Viano as Artist in Residence

Portland Children’s Museum Proud to Present Hannah Viano as Artist in Residence

Portland, April 4th, 2015. The Portland Children’s Museum is presenting Hannah Viano, Author of S is for Salmon: A Northwest Alphabet, and the upcoming book Arrow to Alaska: A Northwest Adventure, as Artist in Residence for its 2015 Artist in Residence Season.

Hannah Viano, Author of S is for Salmon: A Northwest Alphabet,

Hannah Viano, Author of S is for Salmon: A Northwest Alphabet.

S is for Salmon: A Northwest Alphabet book.

S is for Salmon: A Northwest Alphabet book.

Visitors to Portland Children’s Museum can now create artwork with talented professional artists through the museum’s Artist in Residence Program, an ongoing artist series. Funded through Summer 2017 by generous donations from Arlene Schnitzer and The Collins Foundation—with additional funding this year from Regional Arts & Culture Council and Juliet Ashby Hillman Foundation—the program provides museum guests opportunities to explore high quality art materials and the artistic process at the Museum.

As part of the 2015 Artist in Residence season, Hannah Viano will be onsite for a number of days through April 30th, 2015. She will be working with children and families to complete an illustrated guide of the plants and animals found in Outdoor Adventure, the Museum’s outdoor play space which opened on Earth Day of 2014. Hannah’s process involves observation of nature through painting, drawing, paper cutting, and screen printing.

Join the Portland Children’s Museum and Hannah Viano for some creative play and learning on various week and weekend days, including Earth Day, April 22nd; and for a Gallery Showing of completed final works in the Portland Children’s Museum’s Art Gallery from May 1st through July 25th. For more information about specific dates and times the artist will be in studio please visit www.portlandcm.org/hannah-viano. To view images of Hannah Viano’s work visit hannahviano.com/.

For more information about Artist in Residence Programs or to apply for residency please contact [email protected]

ABOUT PORTLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

We’re a museum that doesn’t act like a museum because our audience—children and the adults who care for them—is more important to us than anything we collect. Instead of investing in precious objects, we create priceless opportunities for our visitors to learn through play.

LOCATION In Washington Park across from Oregon Zoo; 4015 SW Canyon Road, Portland, 97221

HOURS Open Daily, 9am-5pmTarget Free First Friday (first Friday every month) 4-8pm

ADMISSION Members: FreeUnder age 1: Free; Ages 1-54: $10Over 55 & military: $9

CONTACT Phone 503-223-6500Online portlandcm.org Like facebook.com/portlandcm

Albertina Kerr’s 80s Prom themed Gala Raises $146,000

Albertina Kerr’s 80s Prom themed Gala Raises $146,000

Portland, February 28th, 2014. More than 280 attendees danced the night away at Albertina Kerr’s 80’s Prom-themed Spotlight on Kerr Gala at Montgomery Park. Guests heard from grateful parent Amy Logue  and were moved to donate more than $146,000 in support of mental health and developmental disability services for children, adults and families at Albertina Kerr. Kim Borton, Mary Beth Butkovic, Kirsten Chambers, Kathryn Hile, and Anton Oehlert served on the committee that organized the event. (photo credits, PDX PhotoLounge and Andie Petkus Photography)

Denise and Rich Smith

Denise and Rich Smith

Randi and John Thoma

Randi and John Thoma

From Albertina Kerr

Since 1907, Albertina Kerr has strengthened Oregon families and communities. Today, we provide programs and services to children and adults with developmental disabilities and mental health challenges – empowering them to live richer lives.

We’re building an army of angels. A community that stands together. Where we challenge the norm to create a society that has no barriers. Where people who face developmental disabilities and mental health challenges are included and empowered. Where families are supported and children have reason to smile. Where everyday people reach out to the most vulnerable and give back to their community.

RACC Work for Art’s 2012-13 Campaign Raises $761,359

RACC Work for Art’s 2012-13 Campaign Raises $761,359

Portland, August 1st, 2013. The Regional Arts & Culture Council announced on Thursday evening that the seventh annual Work for Art campaign raised $761,359, bringing its seven-year total to $4,686,681 raised for local arts organizations. More than 1,900 donors participated in the campaign that began on July 1, 2012 and ended on June 30, 2013, mostly through payroll deduction and other gifts in the workplace. 

The campaign results were delivered by Jeff Harvey, president and CEO of Burgerville, at a special reception Thursday evening in the KeyBank Club at Jeld-Wen Field. Harvey was the honorary chair of the 2012-13 campaign, and will lead the 2013-14 campaign as well, with co-chair Mike Golub, COO of the Portland Timbers. 

“It is a great thing to celebrate arts and culture in our communities,” said Harvey in thanking all those who participated in the campaign. “In today’s business world… there’s no such thing as too much creativity or too much innovation. Investing in a vital arts community is the same as committing to deep and long-term investment in the vitality and innovation of business.”

More than 75 participating companies were acknowledged on Thursday evening, including the top ten Work for Art campaigns in 2012-13:

1. Portland General Electric

2. NW Natural

3. Burgerville

4. The Standard

5. OHSU

6. State of Oregon

7. City of Portland

8. Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects

9. Multnomah County

10. Stoel Rives

Portland General Electric was the top campaign for the second year in a row, increasing their campaign by 6% for a total of $83,530; President and CEO Jim Piro accepted the company’s award and said that PGE employees were enjoying more arts activities thanks to the Arts Card, a benefit of giving to Work for Art. Jack Graves, Chief Cultural Officer at Burgerville, accepted the “top participation” award for the sustainable restaurant chain, which had the most employee donors (410) of any company. Portland Center Stage was acknowledged for raising the most money among nonprofit organizations ($2,442); the award was accepted by development director Charlie Frasier. 

The results reported on Thursday night are down 7.7% from the 2011-12 campaign total (and all-time high) of $824,648. A variety of factors contributed to the downturn, including general anxieties about the economy last fall, and typical fierce competition for contributions during a presidential election cycle. Work for Art leaders remain confident that the campaign will rebound in 2013-14; already several new companies have signed up to participate this year, including Cambia Health Solutions, Gerding Edlen, and Tri-Met. Other company leaders who would like to learn about conducting an employee giving campaign for the arts and culture sector are invited to contact Kathryn Jackson, Work for Art Manager at 503-823-5424 or [email protected]. 

Work for Art is a program of The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC), which distributes 100% of all proceeds to more than 100 arts and culture organizations based in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties through a competitive grant application process. Although Work for Art is primarily a workplace giving program, anyone can participate by making a donation online at workforart.org. The strength of the campaign has been in its ability to accumulate a high volume of smaller gifts; most donations are $150 or less, and $60 is the amount most commonly donated. Donors who pledge $60 or more receive an Arts Card. Most donations are matched dollar-for-dollar by a matching challenge fund that includes contributions from The City of Portland, Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties, the Firstenburg Family Foundation, Sunshine Dairy Foods, and other private donors. 

The 2013-14 campaign is now underway; the goal is to raise $775,000 by June 30, 2014.

Information submitted by Mary Bauer

Communications Associate

racc.org | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

Portland Public Art Project Wins National Award

Portland Public Art Project Wins National Award

Portland, July 25th, 2013. The Public Art Network of the Americans for the Arts has named a local project, “Dekumstruction,” to its 2012 Year in Review, which highlights the 50 most outstanding public art projects in the United States last year. Dekomstruction is also currently featured on the Americans for the Arts website.

The PAN Year in Review is the only national program recognizing projects of excellence in public art. From over 350 applications, three national public art professionals selected 50 outstanding projects that were completed in 2012. The panelists were Justine Topfer, curator, Out of the Box Projects, San Francisco, CA; Norie Sato, artist, Seattle, WA; and John Carson, artist and head of the School of Art, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Dekumstruction is a sculptural artwork integrated with a custom bike rack designed by the artists Buster Simpson and Peg Butler located at the intersection of NE Dekum & Durham, adjacent to the Breakside Brewery. Twenty halved oil barrel planters stenciled with the names of depleted oil fields and painted with an iridescent sheen allude to the culture of big oil. The planters are planted with native species and receive water run-off from the adjacent private property. All of the water then flows through a downspout onto an upended oil barrel that quite literally “beats” the drum on rainy days. The installation celebrates the displacement (deconstruction) of two former car parking spaces with a multifunctional sculpture that accommodates ten bicycles while conveying shifting attitudes about consumption, energy, and stormwater management.

This collaboration was initiated by the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services as a part of their Sustainable Stormwater “green street” program to address stormwater management issues in Portland. They in turn brought in the Transportation Options folks from the Bureau of Transportation to help with bike parking to give the project an aesthetic and augmented conceptual twist, and then turned to the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which hired artists Buster Simpson and Peg Butler. Simpson and Butler helped choose the site, worked the adjacent building owner and the stormwater engineers, designed the prototype for the bike rack and then artwork and its relationship to the adjacent building, and oversaw the fabrication and installation of the above ground work. The overall project budget was nearly $60,000. Funding came from a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency with additional funds from all of the other partners.

Queering Portlandia Opens Minds with Public Photo Booth Project

Queering Portlandia Opens Minds with Public Photo Booth Project

Portland, July 9th, 2013. Artist and performer Anthony Hudson, who identifies as a “queer Portlander, a native Oregonian, and a Grand Ronde Indian,” is opening up a pubic photo booth at the Portland Building Installation Space. The exhibition is part of a series organized by the Regional Arts and Culture Counsel for advanced students in fine art a Portland Building. The community based project by Anthony Hudson, will be open through August 2nd and with it, Hudson hopes to create a series of alternate Portlandias that embody the diversity that exists in Portland today.

Viewing Hours & Location: 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland. Admission is always free. Queering Portlandia runs through August 2nd.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series visit: www.racc.org/installationspace

From RACC:

Project Background: Despite her notoriety and our love for her, Portlandia is irrefutably rooted in European sculptural tradition. The 35 foot high hammered copper statue that graces the façade of the Portland Building depicts the image of a classical female figure with European features. In that sense she represents only a portion our city’s diverse population.  “Queering is essentially to make something queer, different, to make it anti-oppressive; queering here is to make Portlandia accessible again, giving an underprivileged audience a chance to recreate Portlandia in their own image.”

During set hours each week (noon to 2 pm Monday – Thursday, or by appointment via [email protected]), Hudson will transform the Installation Space into a photo booth/performance set complete with a selection of costumes and props. The project is open to anyone who wishes to take part, participants are invited to pose or perform on camera to create their own version of Portlandia. In the artist’s words “Queering Portlandia will allow for a multitude of new Portlandias: Portlandia as a person of color, Portlandia as queer, Portlandia as a person with disabilities, Portlandia as a true, living Portlander. Queering Portlandia will demonstrate our community’s commitment to providing visibility, safety and opportunity to all its citizens.”

About the Artist: Anthony Hudson is an Oregon native and received his BFA in Intermedia from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2013. His work draws on mythology, theatre, popular culture, and critical theory; he has been featured in Hand2Mouth Theatre’s Risk/Reward Festival, Conduit Dance’s Dance+ Festival, and Performance Works NW’s Richard Foreman Mini-Festivals. Hudson is perhaps best known as Portland’s drag clown Carla Rossi, “an immortal trickster whose attempts at hegemonic realness almost always result in fantastic failure and revelations of her own mutability and vulnerability.”

About the Installation Space: Each year the Portland Building Installation Space series reserves several exhibition opportunities for advanced students in fine art. The format and presentation requirements for the student installations are identical to those for established professional artists, the Regional Arts & Culture Council created this separate eligibility category to help introduce emerging talents to the world of public art. Anthony Hudson is the 3rd student artist to present work this season.

Nichols Norman’s Waiting Room Kicks Off New Season of RACC Installations at the Portland Building

Nichols Norman’s Waiting Room Kicks Off New Season of RACC Installations at the Portland Building

Portland, March 13th, 2013. The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) announced a line-up of nine new installations by local artists at the Portland Building Installation Space. Here’s information from RACC about what’s coming:

Over the next twelve months artists representing a wide range of approaches to art making will be featured in 4 week installments. Since 1994 RACC has managed the Installation Space in the Portland Building (located downtown at 1120 SW 5th Avenue) and has presented some of Portland’s best interactive and experimental media installations. At 13’wide by 8′ deep, this modestly sized venue is devoted exclusively to installation art. The space has developed a devout following over the years and competition for a spot on the roster is always spirited.

This year, 71 artists submitted proposals in the Professional Artist category, and 26 artists applied in the Student category. An independent selection panel reviewed all of the proposals, and ultimately selected nine site-specific works that are challenging, topical and diverse.

Portland Building Installation Space—2012/2013 Season Calendar and Project Descriptions:

Nicholas Norman March 25 – April 19, 2013

Jacob Sorenson April 29 – May 24, 2013

Patricia Vazquez Gomez & Betty Marin June 3 – June 28, 2013

Anthony Hudson July 8 – Aug 2, 2013

Michael Sell August 12 – September 6, 2013

Paula Rebsom & Grant Hottle September 16 – October 11, 2013

Ariana Jacob October 21 – November 15, 2013

Paul Clay and Zachary Krausnick January 13– February 7, 2014

Joseph Kucinski February 17 – March 14, 2014

Nicholas Norman (Student – PSU) March 25 – April 19, 2013

Waiting Room – Nicholas Norman’s work, which explores the meanings of places and how we understand them, kicks off the new season of installations at the Portland Building. Nicholas has a particular interest in waiting rooms: “Most of us are familiar with the experience of a waiting room, the uncomfortable seats, the horrible magazines, we know what it is…but what is the difference between a waiting room in an everyday doctor’s office versus a gallery?” Norman will create an artificial waiting room in the Installation Space to explore the difference between a fabrication and a room that is intentionally functional—is a fabricated space really any different if it can serve an identical purpose? Can a waiting room be anything other than a waiting room, or is its true meaning trapped within intention? Norman’s faux waiting room promises uncomfortable seating, dull magazines, a ticking clock, a potted plant, bad (but free) coffee, mediocre landscape paintings and the ubiquitous lost toy underneath the chair. Viewers are encouraged to bring their own interpretation to the installation, in this case however, they will be completely in control of the amount of time they decide to wait.

Jacob Sorenson April 29 – May 24, 2013

A Landscape – “Is Bigfoot real? I hope so. But I’m pessimistic.” This quote from Jacob Sorenson’s proposal might serve as a tagline for his installation. He’ll construct a nature-circus landscape in the space that embodies the human tendency to both ideologically and physically manipulate the environment. To the right picture a silhouette-like sculpture of a majestic tree-line, but with Las Vegas style chase-lights there to help better define the trees. To the left notice a sculpture that sets out to improve upon the beautiful sunset image we all hope for at the end of a day…only maybe with a few extra colors and a repeat cycle so we can enjoy it longer. And finally in the back, slightly obscured by the tree-line, look for that elusive silhouette of Bigfoot rumored to make periodic appearances.

Patricia Vazquez Gomez & Betty Marin (Students – PSU) June 3 – June 28, 201

WelcomeWelcome is intended to inform and expand the connection between a building that represents the City of Portland and the experiences of some of this city’s newer residents. Grounded in this artist team’s social-practice work serving the immigrant community, and in their own cultural roots, the project will explore the ways in which Spanish speaking immigrants feel both welcome and not welcome in Portland. The physical installation will consist of projected images of those interviewed by the team, and text from participants’ responses presented as a “wallpaper” backdrop. In honor of the exchange of hospitality, a small artesanal souvenir will be offered to visitors to take home.

Anthony Hudson (Student – PNCA) July 8 – Aug 2, 2013

Queering Portlandia – Despite her notoriety and our love for her, Portlandia is irrefutably rooted, by sculptural tradition and in concept, to Euro-centrism. The 35 foot high hammered copper statue that graces the façade of the Portland Building depicts the image of a classical female figure with European features. In that sense she represents only a portion our city’s diverse population. Artist and performer Anthony Hudson, who identifies as a “queer Portlander, a native Oregonian, and a Grand Ronde Indian,” will offer up a series of alternate Portlandias that embody the diversity that exists in Portland today. “Queering is essentially to make something queer, different, to make it anti-oppressive; queering here is to make Portlandia accessible again, giving an underprivileged audience a chance to recreate Portlandia in their own image.” The Installation Space will be transformed into a richly decorated photo booth/performance set complete with a selection of costumes and props and participants will be invited to perform on camera as their own version of Portlandia. In the artist’s words “Queering Portlandia will allow for a multitude of new Portlandias: Portlandia as a person of color, Portlandia as queer, Portlandia as a person with disabilities, Portlandia as a true, living Portlander. Queering Portlandia will demonstrate our community’s commitment to providing visibility, safety and opportunity to all its citizens.”

Michael Sell August 12 – September 6, 2013

Untitled (Photoswatch installation) – Photographer Michael Sell’s installation explores the point at which fine art intersects with décor, and investigates how the one supports and/or subverts the other. Sell will turn the Installation Space into a floor-to-ceiling grid of color, with the individual colors to be sourced from actual artwork hung inside the Portland Building. The project will function as a site-specific extension of his Photoswatch series that sampled and presented a single rectangular swatch of color from famous photographs—thus collapsing all visual elements and meaning within the photograph into one single color statement. The painted panels on the grid in the Installation Space will reference individual works of art that are hung throughout the building and each grid will be labeled with the title and location of the source work (for example: Purple Fields, 9th Floor). On the floor of the space Sell will place rows of small “sample sized” cans of paint—all mixed to match the grid colors. These will be offered to visitors to take home as souvenirs so they can ponder how much meaning travels home with them.

Paula Rebsom & Grant Hottle September 16 – October 11, 2013

Forecast – This site-specific project marks the first in a series of collaborations between Rebsom and Hottle. It combines painted and sculptural elements to suggest an impossible but thought provoking NW scene. Upon entering the building lobby the viewer will encounter a painted landscape on a stretched canvas that completely covers the front of the installation space. The scene, a typical Pacific Northwest landscape will physically screen off the entry to the space and will appear as a purpose-built covering…with the exception of an odd protrusion in the center of the painting that stretches the canvas (without puncturing it) and pokes out slightly into the lobby, creating an immediate desire to see what lies behind. As the viewer proceeds to the stairs (which offer a view behind the painting) they discover the cause of the protrusion that intrudes on the landscape and ultimately exposes its façade-like quality. The installation cleverly goads us into reconsidering our reflex definitions of “wild” or “natural” and suggests we consider those terms through a more complex lens.

Ariana Jacob October 21 – November 15, 2013

Working Title: As You Make Your Bed, So You Must Lie in It? – Social Practice artist Ariana Jacob has proposed an “artist-in-residence” installation designed to create an intimate, yet public setting where people will discuss thoughts and feelings about being both a single individual citizen as well as an element of the collective entity that is the United States. The space will be set up as a bedroom (an intimate space everyone is familiar with) with the U.S. Constitution printed on the bed spread. The Articles and Amendments to the Constitution will be screen printed on the pillowcases, the walls of the space will be transformed into chalk-boards on which different sections of the Constitution will be written. As the installation progresses the chalkboard text will be collaboratively edited as agreed upon by artist and participants. Jacob, a veteran of several successful conversation-based projects, will keep regularly scheduled hours and will focus the sessions on gaining a better sense of “American identity” by addressing the document that legally and symbolically binds us together as a people.

Ariana Jacob’s Conversation Station project from the 2009/2010; Jacob and eight other artists will present new a new set of installations at the Portland Building over the next 12 months.

Paul Clay and Zachary Krausnick January 13– February 7, 2014

Leda and the Swan – This team of I.T. savvy artists will present a fully interactive video interpretation of the classic “Leda and the Swan” story. In the darkened space a real-time digital projection will produce an image on the back wall of the installation space that is responsive to, and directed by, visitors’ body movements. As participants walk up to the opening of the space a projection of a swan will appear on the wall before them—the movements of the swan will mirror the movements of the participant as the viewer widens his/her arms, feathered wings will spread on the projected image, the swan’s feet will step and its neck will crane to match how the viewer orients his/her body. Ultimately the viewer will discover that faster, more violent movements will cause the feathers to fall off to reveal the figure of a woman (Leda). If the participant then returns to slower movements Leda will once again grow new feathers and transform back into the swan. The cycle continues on as long as there are participants willing to move.

Joseph Kucinski February 17 – March 14, 2014

The Tenacity of Change – Kucinski’s project is aimed at capturing a moment of wonderment and curious expectation. The installation will be composed of a custom garage door fit precisely into the space. With the viewer positioned “inside” the garage looking towards the outside, the door itself will be set so that the bottom edge hovers approximately two feet above the floor. A flood of mysterious colored light from under the door illuminates the darkened “garage” space. The piece is designed to create a sense of expectation and wonder as the viewer ponders what might lie ahead in the future if we are bold enough to (figuratively) open the door of the garage and move into the larger world, to look beyond the trepidation the future carries with it and think of it as an opportunity with infinite possibilities.

Viewing Hours & Location: 7 am to 6 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.
Chelsea, 2012. Nicholas Norman’s work, which explores the meanings of places and

how we understand them, kicks off a new season of installations at the Portland Building.

Ariana Jacob’s Conversation Station project from the 2009/2010; Jacob and eight other artists will present new a new set of installations at the Portland Building over the next 12 months.

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Information submitted by Mary Bauer

Communications Associate

Regional Arts & Culture Council

411 NW Park, Suite 101, Portland, OR 97209

Oscar-nominated filmmaker donates portrait to benefit The Right Brain Initiative

Oscar-nominated filmmaker donates portrait to benefit The Right Brain Initiative

Portland, June 26th. Nationally renowned filmmaker Todd Haynes is the subject of a one-of-a-kind portrait that posted on eBay. This ten-day auction supports a good cause: Haynes donated the giclee print to benefit The Right Brain Initiative’s arts education programming in Portland, Oregon area schools. The print is signed by both Haynes and the portrait’s artist, Steve Cohn. Cohn is brother-in-law to Haynes, and works under the pseudonym Jasper Marks.

The giclee print is available in an eBay auction through Sunday, August 5.  http://r.ebay.com/iNGdP7

Caption: Portrait of Todd Haynes by Steve Cohn

Portrait of Todd Haynes by Steve Cohn

Cohn rendered the portrait in homage to Haynes’ remarkable body of work in filmmaking. Haynes, a Portland resident, is the creative mind behind Far from Heaven, a feature film starring Julianne Moore, for which he was nominated an Academy Award for original screenplay; and I’m Not There, a biopic about Bob Dylan. He is also the writer/director of Mildred Pierce, a 2011 HBO miniseries nominated for an unprecedented 21 Primetime Emmy awards.

The original oil painting of this portrait hangs in Portland City Hall, inducted in April 2011 by Mayor Sam Adams as a testament to the city’s dedication to supporting independent artists and cultural leaders. “This office is honored to display such a beautiful portrait of one of our most prolific artists,” said Adams at the hanging.

The Right Brain Initiative’s dedication to providing rich arts education to all K-8 students in Portland resonates with Haynes’ personal experience as a student. “Music, art was all part of basic curriculum that most of us grew up with in the public school system. It’s a really different story today,” he said. “I’m extremely honored to have played even the smallest part in supporting The Right Brain Initiative and its commitment to bringing art and the value of creative experience into the lives of so many young people.”

The auction closes at noon on Sunday, August 5. Portlanders can see the work in person during business hours at the Lara Sydney Framing Gallery, 1230 NW Hoyt Street (including the First Thursday art walk on the evening of August 2) through the end of the auction. http://www.larasydney.com/

Links:

About The Right Brain Initiative

The Right Brain Initiative is an equity-based arts education partnership of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, serving the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. During the 2011-12 school year, Right Brain brought learning to life for 11,500 students and 31 schools with visual and media arts, music, dance and more. In 2012-13, the program will grow to serve 45 schools. Established in 2008, the program’s vision is to transform learning for all children in the Portland area through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serves as Implementation Partner. Read more online at TheRightBrainInitiative.org

About the Regional Arts & Culture Council

RACC is a nonprofit arts services organization serving the Portland metropolitan area, including Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. In addition to serving as the managing partner for The Right Brain Initiative, RACC provides grants for artists, arts organizations, schools and other community-based arts projects; conducts workplace giving for arts and culture (“Work for Art”) and other advocacy efforts; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance; shares printed and web-based resources for artists; and integrates artwork into public places. Read more online at racc.org.

Ten Prodigies Triumph at the 2012 Van Buren Concerto Competition

Ten Prodigies Triumph at the 2012 Van Buren Concerto Competition

Portland, April 10th.  A Gala Concert spotlighted the ten winners of the 18th annual Young Artists Debut contest. MetroArts Inc. organized the competition. The 10 soloists were selected from an initial pool of 51 entrants. Winners performed with Neil DePonte and an orchestra drawn from the ranks of the Oregon Symphony and Oregon Ballet Theatre orchestras at the Newmark Theatre. (Photo Credit, John Rudoff, M.D.)

Sherry Liang of Happy Valley, Oregon is a 16 year-old pianist and studies with Barbara Parker. Sherry is a junior at Clackamas High School and will perform the first movement of the Prokofiev Concerto in C Major, No.3.

Sherry Liang of Happy Valley, Oregon is a 16 year-old pianist and studies with Barbara Parker. Sherry is a junior at Clackamas High School and performed the first movement of the Prokofiev Concerto in C Major, No.3.

 
Rachel Graves of Vancouver, Washington is a 14 year-old violinist and studies with Clarisse Atcherson. Rachel is a freshman at Mountain View High School and will perform Saint-Saens’ Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso.

Rachel Graves of Vancouver, Washington is a 14 year-old violinist and studies with Clarisse Atcherson. Rachel is a freshman at Mountain View High School and performed Saint-Saens’ Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso.

 
Kayla Wilkens of Salem, Oregon is a 21 year-old soprano and studies with Gwen Leonard. Kayla is a senior at Linfield College pursuing a BA in Vocal Performance and is now a two-time winner of the Young Artists Debut! Competition having also performed in the 2008 concert.

Kayla Wilkens of Salem, Oregon is a 21 year-old soprano and studies with Gwen Leonard. Kayla is a senior at Linfield College pursuing a BA in Vocal Performance and is now a two-time winner of the Young Artists Debut! Competition having also performed in the 2008 concert.

 
Niel DePonte, artistic director and conductor of the Young Artists Debut!

Young artists applaud Niel DePonte, the artistic director and conductor.

 
The event was at the Newmark Theater

The event was at the Newmark Theater

 
Nikolaas Top of Salem, Oregon is a 17 year-old pianist and studies with Harold Gray. Nikolas is a junior at the Veritas School and will perform the first movement of Saint-Saens’ Concerto No. 2.

Nikolaas Top of Salem, Oregon is a 17 year-old pianist and studies with Harold Gray. Nikolas is a junior at the Veritas School and performed the first movement of Saint-Saens’ Concerto No. 2.

 

The concert was sponsored by Mr. John VanBuren in support of the children of the Portland, Vancouver communities in pursuing their musical goals.

After this year’s competition, Niel DePonte, who is also music director and conductor for Oregon Ballet Theatre and who has been nominated for a Grammy Award as a concerto soloist himself said, “This is an exciting class of young artists and, on average, one of the youngest we’ve ever had. I look forward to working with them for the next few months and having them make appearances in schools and other venues along the way. They are terrific role models for other children, showing what hard work and determination can achieve.”

 About MetroArts Inc.:

MetroArts Inc’s mission is to teach creative and critical thinking processes through innovative arts education programs and curricula.

MetroArts mission consists of three fundamental objectives to support the ideal:

  • To inspire every participant in the programs to contribute to the culture of their times by doing their life’s work in a creative, artistic, joyful and disciplined manner.
  • To educate about the arts of all cultures, provide insight into the process of creative thought and experiences with creativity itself. To promote access to the arts through participation, creation and reflection for all.
  • To create partnerships that enable arts education to thrive in the public schools.
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