Oregon Historical Society Gearing up for Reopening and Rose City Soccer Exhibit

Oregon Historical Society Gearing up for Reopening and Rose City Soccer Exhibit

Portland, OR. “We are the Rose City! A History of Soccer in Portland.” That’s the focus of a new exhibit coming to the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) in late July. The Oregon Historical Society Museum will be reopening its doors to the public on Saturday, July 11th at 10:00 A.M. It has been closed since March 14th due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The Timber exhibit photo above features Mamadou “Futty” Danso, Jack Jewsbury and Steve Purdy celebrated a win following the Timbers first home game in the MLS era. (Photographer Craig Mitchelldyer, Courtesy of Portland Timbers.)

“We’re looking forward to reopening,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. “We’ve got lots for people to see, and we’ll be following of course all the guidelines required by the state and the county as far as face coverings and social distancing.” Museum-goers will be able to check out OHS’s permanent exhibit, “Experience Oregon,” which debuted last year and chronicles “the good, the bad and the ugly,” of Oregon’s history, according to Tymchuk. Additionally, the new exhibit entitled, “Soccer in the Rose City,” will explore a full history of Portland’s soccer culture. 

Capo Tina leads section 108 during a 2019 Portland Thorns game. (Courtesy of 107 Independent Supporters Trust.)

Over the past few months, OHS has been busy producing a weekly newsletter and keeping the community updated and informed through social media.

“We’ve been very proud of all the work and material we’ve been able to provide through our social media outlets,” Tymchuk said. “We’ve been putting out great material on the pandemic, such as the Spanish flu pandemic of 100 years ago and how it impacted Oregon and lessons learned and not learned. And then we were able over the past couple of weeks to put out just a phenomenal amount of material on racial justice and equity.”

Just before having to shut its doors on March 14th, the museum was getting ready to debut an exhibit entitled, “Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment.” Museum-goers will still be able to check out the exhibit when OHS reopens. “[It’s] a phenomenal exhibit—artifacts and documents, chronicling the fight for equal rights for women and giving them the right to vote,” Tymchuk said. “We’re anxious to give that a showing to everybody.” 

March in 1913 in support of women’s right to vote. Photo featured in OHS exhibit, “Nevertheless, They Persisted.”

Additionally, the OHS has a variety of virtual programs that can be found on the OHS website that will still be available after the museum reopens. 

According to Tymchuk, due to good financial planning and the Multnomah County levy, which provides the museum with funding, the OHS has not had to make any mass lay-offs or budget cuts. “We’ve been very fortunate,” he said. 

Tymchuk encourages anyone interested in supporting the OHS to visit the museum after it reopens, to make a tax-deductible donation, or to become OHS members. “A membership in OHS is a great deal, and we encourage people to become members—that way they get all the material that we put out,” he said. He also provided this reminder: “Here in Portland, because of the Multnomah County levy, all Multnomah County residents have free admission [to the museum].”

“We’ve been actively fulfilling our mission during this time,” Tymchuk said, referring to the pandemic’s effect on the OHS. “We certainly live in a time where people are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of history.” 

Kerry Tymchuk and Kate Brown

OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk and Oregon Governor Kate Brown in June 2013.

Following re-opening, public museum and store hours will be Wednesdays – Saturdays from 10 am – 5 pm and Sundays from 12 pm – 5 pm. The OHS Research Library remains closed for renovations that began in January 2020. More information on library services that are available during the renovation can be found at ohs.org/libraryreno.

About the Oregon Historical Society: 

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

 

Record Donations for Oregon Cultural Trust Means More Funds for Local Nonprofits

Record Donations for Oregon Cultural Trust Means More Funds for Local Nonprofits

Salem, OR. A new mix of marketing strategies attracted 55.2 percent more new donors and 6.7 percent more total donations – a record $4.9 million – to the Oregon Cultural Trust in 2017. The funds will support fiscal year 2019 grants to cultural organizations across the state. Recent grants have helped fund projects like transforming a major gallery at Portland Children’s Museum into The Studio – a clay, maker and multi-purpose art space for families.

The FY2019 Cultural Development Grant Guidelines, with budget form, are now posted here. The online application will open March 1, 2018 with an application deadline of April 13, 2018. The FY19 Cultural Development grant cycle are for projects taking place August 1, 2018 – July 31, 2019. Grant seekers interested in applying for Cultural Trust grants are encouraged to attend the 2018 Conversation with Funders & Partners workshops.

Executive Director Brian Rogers explains how the Cultural Trust attracted more donors. “We changed it up a bit, investing more of our resources in grassroots marketing. The goal was to have as many one-on-one conversations with cultural donors as possible. These results validate that strategy. We are looking forward to investing the increased funding in cultural activities throughout Oregon.”

“People are the best communicators of how the cultural tax credit works,” said Cultural Trust Board Chair Chuck Sams. “Our teams attended countless cultural events to talk with patrons about using the tax credit to double the statewide impact of their cultural giving. It is gratifying that Oregonians answered the call to continue strengthening Oregon’s cultural community and overall quality of life.”

The Cultural Trust contracted with bell+funk of Eugene and Artslandia of Portland to help plan and implement its 2017 marketing campaign. Working with Trust staff, they launched a new Ambassador program, a comprehensive online toolkit, a Make-a-Match game to engage event patrons and a first-ever Cultural Trust phone bank. They also adjusted campaign creative to better tell grant impact stories and helped to strengthen promotional partnerships with cultural and media partners.

Cultural Trust board members actively participated, hosting Ambassador events and submitting letters to the editor to media outlets across the state.

The $4.9 million fundraising total – up from just shy of $4.6 million in 2016 – includes 9,767 donations and 1,642 new donors, up from 1,058 in 2016. It also includes $406,827 raised through the Willamette Week Give!Guide, a 3 percent increase over 2016.

More than half of the money raised will be distributed directly to Oregon’s cultural groups this summer; the remainder will grow the Cultural Trust permanent fund. Cultural Trust grants are distributed through five Statewide Cultural Partners – Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Humanities and the Oregon State Office of Historic Preservation – as well as to 45 county/tribal coalitions and directly to cultural nonprofits via Cultural Development Grants.

The more than 100 projects supported by Cultural Development Grants in FY2018 include:

the “Racing to Change: Oregon’s Civil Rights Years” interactive exhibit at Oregon Historical Society and community programming by the Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem;

  • Theater lighting and sound equipment upgrades for the Florence Events Center;
  • The renovation of the historic Baker Orpheum Theatre to become a community performing arts center in Baker City;
  • Exhibits and programs that highlight the LBGTQ community and Native youth as part of a Cultural Diversity Initiative by the High Desert Museum in Bend; and

View a full list of Cultural Trust grant projects and links to Cultural County Coalitions with lists of county projects they fund.

Again, here are the details about applying for the grants:

The FY2019 Cultural Development Grant Guidelines, with budget form, are now posted here.

The online application will open March 1, 2018 with an application deadline of April 13, 2018. The FY19 Cultural Development grant cycle are for projects taking place August 1, 2018 – July 31, 2019. Grant seekers interested in applying for Cultural Trust grants are encouraged to attend the 2018 Conversation with Funders & Partners workshops.

Grants are awarded in four categories and are intended to fund arts, heritage, history, preservation and humanities programs.

Cultural Development Grants are for project activities that:

  • Protect and stabilize Oregon’s cultural resources;
  • Expand public awareness of, access to and participation in quality cultural experiences in Oregon;
  • Ensure that Oregon cultural resources are strong and dynamic contributors to Oregon’s communities and quality of life; and
  • Build an understanding of the value and impact of culture to Oregonians.

The four grant categories are:

  • Access: Make culture broadly available to Oregonians;
  • Preservation: Invest in Oregon’s cultural heritage by recovering, preserving and sharing historic assets and achievements;
  • Creativity: Create and/or present cultural or scholarly work; Support the development of artists, cultural experts, or scholars who promote culture as a core part of vibrant communities; and
  • Capacity: Strengthen cultural organizations to increase stability, improve sustainability, or measure/share cultural impacts.

In considering funding requests, the Cultural Trust seeks proposals that will expand the public benefit of Oregon’s culture through:

  • Positive impact on, or improvement of, cultural resources and activities and the expansion of public and private support for culture;
  • Preservation of the past or investing in the future, by commissioning new work that continues Oregon’s strong artistic, literary and humanistic presence;
  • Enhancing cultural opportunity and understanding by creating or sustaining model programs that can be replicated elsewhere; and
  • By creating opportunity for every community to invest further in its culture, stimulating new ventures that could not be tried without Trust help.

The Trust’s two non-competitive grant programs fund the Trust’s five statewide Cultural Partners and 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions.

Have questions? Contact Aili Schreiner at [email protected] or 503.986.0089. You may schedule a 30 minute grant application conversation before April 13, and may submit draft applications for feedback by March 31.

FY19 Cultural Development Grants

As part of the grant agreement (sent directly to recipients), FY19 CDV grant recipients must complete and submit the following to [email protected]:

FY18 Cultural Coalition Grants

FY18 Cultural Coalition Grants have been awarded!

Cultural Coalitions may now submit their FY18 Contact Form to [email protected] Please include as attachments:

  • Updated Board Roster: Include names and contact information
  • Grant Guidelines & Application: Have you updated your grant guidelines or application since last year? If yes, please attach your new versions (PDF format)
  • Cultural Plan: Have you updated your Cultural Plan? If yes, please attach your updated plan (PDF format). For tribal coalitions, your Cultural Resource Department Plan can be submitted instead.

Questions? Please contact [email protected] or (503) 986-0082 or [email protected] or (503) 986-0089.

FY17 Cultural Participation (Coalition) Sub-Grant Forms

Please submit your completed form and send to: [email protected] Questions? Call us at (503) 986-0082.

The Columbia River Photos “From Source to Sea” Debut

The Columbia River Photos “From Source to Sea” Debut

Portland, OR. The Oregon Historical Society has a new exhibit featuring the work of Hood River Photographer Peter Marbach. He straddled the source of the river near Canal Flats, BC. It’s an underground spring, most likely fed by the Kootenay River. Peter Marbach is documenting the landscapes and culture of the entire 1,250 miles of the Columbia River, from its beginnings, to the two-mile-wide confluence with the Pacific. The exhibit, which runs from January 19th – April 1st, is called The Columbia River: From Source to Sea. Here’s a glimpse of a few of the images.

by photographer Peter Marbach of wildflowers during last light on Dog Mountain.

Photographer Peter Marbach captures wildflowers during last light on Dog Mountain.

Purcell Mts reflect in calm water near Spillimacheen, BC.

The Purcell Mountains are reflected in calm water near Spillimacheen, BC.

Screen Shot 2017-02-04 at 8.05.13 PM

Akisqnuk First Nation elder Pete Sanchez is featured in this photo along the shores of the Columbia near Windermere, BC.

While this exhibit showcases the beauty, culture, and geographic diversity of Nch I Wana – The Big River, it is the hope of photographer Peter Marbach that this display will launch greater public awareness and encourage those at the negotiating table to consider the moral obligation of honoring aboriginal knowledge of river restoration and to harness the will and existing technology to bring back the ancient runs of salmon that will once again make the Columbia a life giving source to all.

Peter Marbach will be on hand to talk about his photos on Wednesday, February 15th from 7 AM – 8:30. He will discuss the importance of the current Columbia River Treaty re-negotiations and its implications that may lead to the eventual return of Pacific Salmon all the way to the headwaters.

The event will take place at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave, in Portland.

Oregon Historical Society Celebrates Chinese New Year With a Bang

Oregon Historical Society Celebrates Chinese New Year With a Bang

Portland, February 7th, 2016. The Oregon Historical Society (OHS), in partnership with local dragon dance teams, hosted a mile long parade to celebrate the Year of the Monkey. The parade started in Chinatown and finished at the Oregon Historical Society at 1200 SW Park Ave. One special attraction was 60-foot dragon that required 21 people to operate; it hadn’t been seen in public for at least 10 years. Oregon Historical Society is opening two new exhibitions including “Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion” and “Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns,” that will open February 29th. (photo credit, Andie Petkus)

The Portland Lee's Association Lion Dance Team has performed at thousands of events and is in great demand for performances throughout the year.

The Portland Lee’s Association Lion Dance Team has performed at thousands of events and is in demand throughout the year.

The parade started at NW 4th & Davis and featured volunteers from Portland Lee Association Dragon & Lion Dance Team.

The parade started at NW 4th & Davis and moved through downtown Portland.

Kerry Tymchuk, the Executive Director of the Historical Society connects with supporters at the celebration lunch.

Kerry Tymchuk, the Executive Director of the Historical Society, connects with supporters at the celebration lunch.

The Monkey is ninth of the 12 animals in the recurring 12-year Chinese zodiac cycle. Every 12 years there is a Monkey year. (Interestingly, Monkey years are all multiples of 12 — from 12 AD, through 1200 AD, to now in 2016.)

The Monkey is ninth of the 12 animals in the recurring 12-year Chinese zodiac cycle. Every 12 years there is a Monkey year and 2016 is one of those years.

“Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns,”

Coming up at the Oregon Historical Society from “Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns.” Using both rare and seldom seen objects like Chinese opera costumes, theatrical sets, bilingual text, audiovisual media, and interactive visitor stations, Beyond the Gate tells a sprawling transnational story of contact and trade between China and the West, focusing on Portland’s Old (1850-1905) and New Chinatown (1905-1950).

1939 Chinese New Year, Portland

The Lan Su Chinese Garden is also a hub of cultural excitment for the New Year.

The Lan Su Chinese Garden is also a hub of cultural excitement for the New Year.

The Lan Su two-week celebration is popular with families and individuals and features lion dances, glowing lanterns, cultural activities, and more. The celebration ends with four nights of Lantern Viewing Evenings when the garden is illuminated with colorful lanterns and lively dragon processions.

Can You Volunteer for a Nonprofit? We’re Bringing The Standard’s 2015 Volunteer Expo to You!

Can You Volunteer for a Nonprofit? We’re Bringing The Standard’s 2015 Volunteer Expo to You!

Portland, September 10th, 2015. If you couldn’t join the thousands who flocked to Pioneer Courthouse Square for The Standard’s Annual Volunteer Expo, you’re in luck. We’ve got all the information and website links to explore over 125 local nonprofits that could use your time.

A full list of links of nonprofits is at the bottom of our story.

R. Richard Crockett, (left) is the Program Operations Director & Volunteer Coordinator

R. Richard Crockett, (left) is the Program Operations Director & Volunteer Coordinator at Chess for Success.

Classroom Law Project is a non-profit organization of individuals, educators, lawyers, and civic leaders building strong communities by teaching students to become active citizens.

Classroom Law Project is a non-profit organization of individuals, educators, lawyers, and civic leaders building strong communities by teaching students to become active citizens.

The Standard’s Volunteer Expo has repeat participants year after year, here’s a look at some nonprofits which continue to recruit volunteers:

Jenny Bedell-Stiles and Andy Meeks from Friends of Trees

Jenny Bedell-Stiles and Andy Meeks from Friends of Trees

PHAME Academy's Katie Farewell talks with Casey Rhodes and Clark Hays.

talks with Casey Rhodes and Clark Hays.

Jenny chu from Literary Arts

Jenny Chu from Literary Arts

New Avenues For Youth were a hit because they dished out the Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream!

New Avenues For Youth volunteers are a hit every year because they dish out the free Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream!

Rachel Rundles from Oregon Historical Society

Rachel Randles from Oregon Historical Society

The Volunteers of America recruited some new volunteers!

The Volunteers of America recruited some new volunteers!

Special Olympics Oregon was recruiting volunteers.

Special Olympics Oregon has room for coaches and event volunteers.

Newspace Center for Photography

Newspace Center for Photography promoted its multidimensional photography resource center and community hub for students, working artists, professional photographers, educators, and photo-enthusiasts of all types.

Latino Network's Edgar Ortega

Latino Network’s Edgar Ortega

Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro Area had a colorful display.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro Area had a colorful display.

Donations to Work for Art’s Community Fund and Arts Education Fund support more than 80 vital arts and culture organizations every year—encompassing dance, visual arts, music, literary arts, media arts, theater, cultural arts, and arts education

The Work for Art’s Community Fund and Arts Education Fund support more than 80 arts and culture organizations every year—encompassing dance, visual arts, music, literary arts, media arts, theater, cultural arts, and arts education.

IMPACT NW drew interested prospective volunteers who learned that each year over 60,000 low-income children, youth, families, seniors, and adults with disabilities participate in Impact NW’s comprehensive anti-poverty programs.

IMPACT NW drew prospective volunteers who learned that each year over 60,000 low-income children, youth, families, seniors, and adults with disabilities participate in Impact NW’s comprehensive anti-poverty programs.

The YMCA was handing out information about programs.

The YMCA was handing out information about programs.

People who stopped by The Q Center booth were met with a friendly smile.

People who stopped by The Q Center booth were met with a friendly smile.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Oregon Chapter staffers promoted their many volunteer options.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Oregon Chapter staffers promoted their many volunteer options.

Reps from the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon explained their work on behalf of local cats and kittens.

Reps from the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon explained their work on behalf of local cats and kittens.

American Red Cross volunteer recruiters had the trademark red vests!

American Red Cross volunteer recruiters had the trademark red vests!

The mission of the Make-A-Wish Oreogn Foundation® is to grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy.

The mission of the Make-A-Wish Oreogn Foundation® is to grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy.

Northwest Pilot Project began in 1969 as an all volunteer agency to provide basic supports for seniors at risk of losing their ability to live independently.

Northwest Pilot Project began in 1969 as an all volunteer agency to provide basic supports for seniors at risk of losing their ability to live independently.

Miracle Theatre Group is The Northwest's premiere Latino arts and culture organization.

Miracle Theatre Group is The Northwest’s premiere Latino arts and culture organization.

Camp Fire offers opportunities for volunteers who like to work with kids.

Camp Fire offers opportunities for volunteers who like to work with kids.

Kathy Pienovi from Bridge Meadows

Bridge Meadows is a multi-generation housing community serving Oregon’s vulnerable populations; foster youth, adoptive parents and elders (55+).

Here’s a list of links to charities at the The Standard’s Volunteer Expo. Please consider donating your time, and tell them PortlandSocietyPage.com sent you!

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Human Services

Education

Environment, Animals

Health

Public/Society Benefit