Record Breaking $2.5 Million Raised at 25th Friends of the Children Benefit

Record Breaking $2.5 Million Raised at 25th Friends of the Children Benefit

Portland, OR. Friends of the Children celebrated 25 years by raising $2.51 million at its annual Friend Raiser benefit on May 10th. More than 740 guests came out for the event to honor Friends of the Children founders Duncan and Cindy Campbell as well as the hundreds of current program youth and alumni who’ve benefited from having a professional mentor in their lives. At the event, founder Duncan Campbell, was joined on stage by 25 current and former program youth and professional mentors to commemorate 25 years of Friends of the Children. (Photo credit, Kelly Mooney and Justine Reimnitz)

Priscilla and Dan Wieden, co-founder of Wieden + Kennedy, an event sponsor.

Founder, Duncan Campbell, talks with Michele and Greg Goodwin.

Friend Raiser guests bid on unique silent auction items.

Their first year at Friend Raiser, Beaches Restaurant from Vancouver, WA was a huge crowd pleaser.

Presented by Express Employment Professionals and Verizon, the event began with an open house at the Friends of the Children headquarters and a silent auction. Guests moved from room to room, grazing on gourmet hors d’oeuvres and sipping bubbles, while bidding on garden, wine, and vacation packages. Friends and youth then helped guide supporters to a massive tent for the evening’s live program through their famous high-five tunnel.

With only 10 live auction packages and a fast-paced special appeal, the crowd’s energy stayed high and the paddles were raised even higher. When all was said and done, the event set a new fundraising record at $2.51 million. Of that, $1.7 million was raised in the special appeal alone.

Before the record breaking special appeal, Randy Corradine, Director of Education & Equity, whose siblings are program graduates, addressed the audience and Friends of the Children founder, Duncan Campbell. “Duncan, you created this… Everyone in the crowd tonight is here because of you. Everyone on this stage and peppered throughout this space is here because of you. In 25 years, you have impacted thousands of lives and because of the ripple effect, those impacted lives will impact tens of thousands more lives in the next 25 years.”

From Friends of the Children:

Friends of the Children – Portland would like to extend a huge thank you to their major event sponsors!

Express Employment Professionals

Verizon

Columbia Forest Products

Acme Construction Supply

Campbell Global

Bob’s Red Mill

Grand + Benedicts

Touchmark

Wieden + Kennedy

Convergence Networks

CareOregon

Friends of the Children – Portland is the founding chapter of a nationwide organization dedicated to breaking the cycle of generational poverty through salaried, professional mentoring. For 25 years, Friends of the Children has used evidence-based strategies, long-term interventions, and nurturing relationships to serve youth facing the greatest societal challenges. For every $1 invested in program youth, $7 is returned to the community in savings within the public sector and contributions to the private sector, according to a Harvard Alumni Association of Oregon research. This year, Friends of the Children was named the number one Most-Admired Nonprofit in Oregon by the Portland Business Journal for the fourth time in six years.

Throwing Out a Lifeline Can Help Prevent Suicide

Throwing Out a Lifeline Can Help Prevent Suicide

Portland, OR. “If you need help, please call.” That’s the message from counselors at the local suicide prevention nonprofit, Lines for life — calling them is free and confidential.

SUICIDE LIFELINE
Call 800-273-8255
Text 273TALK to 839863.

When famous individuals like Kate Spade or Anthony Bourdain commit suicide, experts worry that media coverage might prompt others to try to solve a temporary problem with an all too permanent, and tragic, solution. There were, for example, more calls than usual to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, (1-800-273-8255) after the death of Robin Williams.

Lines for Life is a regional nonprofit dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide that offers help and hope to individuals and communities, and promotes mental health for all. When a crisis arises or support is needed, counselors are available 24/7/365 to intervene with personalized help. Here’s a video about the service:

Experts suggest that you take the time to check in with friends and loved ones. Ask them how they’re really feeling. And if you’re worried that someone you know might be thinking about suicide, here’s how & why the 5 steps of #BeThe1To can help. The five action steps for communicating with someone who may be suicidal are supported by evidence in the field of suicide prevention:

  1. ASK

How – Asking the question “Are you thinking about suicide?” communicates that you’re open to speaking about suicide in a non-judgmental and supportive way. Asking in this direct, unbiased manner, can open the door for effective dialogue about their emotional pain and can allow everyone involved to see what next steps need to be taken. Other questions you can ask include, “How do you hurt?” and “How can I help?” Do not ever promise to keep their thoughts of suicide a secret.

The flip side of the “Ask” step is to “Listen.” Make sure you take their answers seriously and not to ignore them, especially if they indicate they are experiencing thoughts of suicide. Listening to their reasons for being in such emotional pain, as well as listening for any potential reasons they want to continue to stay alive, are both incredibly important when they are telling you what’s going on. Help them focus on their reasons for living and avoid trying to impose your reasons for them to stay alive.

Why – Studies show that asking at-risk individuals if they are suicidal does not increase suicides or suicidal thoughts. In fact, studies suggest the opposite: findings suggest acknowledging and talking about suicide may in fact reduce rather than increase suicidal ideation.

  1. KEEP THEM SAFE

How – First of all, it’s good for everyone to be on the same page. After the “Ask” step, and you’ve determined suicide is indeed being talked about, it’s important to find out a few things to establish immediate safety. Have they already done anything to try to kill themselves before talking with you? Does the person experiencing thoughts of suicide know how they would kill themselves? Do they have a specific, detailed plan? What’s the timing for their plan? What sort of access to do they have to their planned method?

Why – Knowing the answers to each of these questions can tell us a lot about the imminence and severity of danger the person is in. For instance, the more steps and pieces of a plan that are in place, the higher their severity of risk and their capability to enact their plan might be. Or if they have immediate access to a firearm and are very serious about attempting suicide, then extra steps (like calling the authorities or driving them to an emergency department) might be necessary. The Lifeline can always act as a resource during these moments as well if you aren’t entirely sure what to do next.

The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health notes that reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal means (or chosen method for a suicide attempt) is an important part of suicide prevention. A number of studies have indicated that when lethal means are made less available or less deadly, suicide rates by that method decline, and frequently suicide rates overall decline. Research also shows that “method substitution” or choosing an alternate method when the original method is restricted, frequently does not happen. The myth “If someone really wants to kill themselves, they’ll find a way to do it” often does not hold true if appropriate safety measures are put into place. The Keep Them Safe step is really about showing support for someone during the times when they have thoughts of suicide by putting time and distance between the person and their chosen method, especially methods that have shown higher lethality (like firearms and medications).

  1. BE THERE

How – This could mean being physically present for someone, speaking with them on the phone when you can, or any other way that shows support for the person at risk. An important aspect of this step is to make sure you follow through with the ways in which you say you’ll be able to support the person – do not commit to anything you are not willing or able to accomplish. If you are unable to be physically present with someone with thoughts of suicide, talk with them to develop some ideas for others who might be able to help as well (again, only others who are willing, able, and appropriate to be there). Listening is again very important during this step – find out what and who they believe will be the most effective sources of help.

Why – Being there for someone with thoughts of suicide is life-saving. Increasing someone’s connectedness to others and limiting their isolation (both in the short and long-term) has shown to be a protective factor against suicide. Thomas Joiner’s Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide highlights connectedness as one of its main components – specifically, a low sense of belonging. When someone experiences this state, paired with perceived burdonsomeness (arguably tied to “connectedness” through isolating behaviors and lack of a sense of purpose) and acquired capability (a lowered fear of death and habituated experiences of violence), their risk can become severely elevated.

In the Three-Step Theory (or more commonly known as the Ideation-to-Action Framework), David Klonsky and Alexis May also theorize that “connectedness” is a key protective factor, not only against suicide as a whole, but in terms of the escalation of thoughts of suicide to action. Their research has also shown connectedness acts as a buffer against hopelessness and psychological pain.

By “being there,” we have a chance to alleviate or eliminate some of these significant factors.

  1. HELP THEM CONNECT

How – Helping someone with thoughts of suicide connect with ongoing supports (like the Lifeline, 800-273-8255) can help them establish a safety net for those moments they find themselves in a crisis. Additional components of a safety net might be connecting them with supports and resources in their communities. Explore some of these possible supports with them – are they currently seeing a mental health professional? Have they in the past? Is this an option for them currently? Are there other mental health resources in the community that can effectively help?

One way to start helping them find ways to connect is to work with them to develop a safety plan. This can include ways for them identify if they start to experience significant, severe thoughts of suicide along with what to do in those crisis moments. A safety plan can also include a list of individuals to contact when a crisis occurs. The My3 app is a safety planning and crisis intervention app that can help develop these supports and is stored conveniently on your smartphone for quick access.

Why – Impact of Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training on the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline found that individuals that called the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline were significantly more likely to feel less depressed, less suicidal, less overwhelmed, and more hopeful by the end of calls handled by Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training-trained counselors. These improvements were linked to ASIST-related counselor interventions, including listening without judgment, exploring reasons for living and creating a network of support.

  1. FOLLOW UP

How – After your initial contact with a person experiencing thoughts of suicide, and after you’ve connected them with the immediate support systems they need, make sure to follow-up with them to see how they’re doing. Leave a message, send a text, or give them a call. The follow-up step is a great time to check in with them to see if there is more you are capable of helping with or if there are things you’ve said you would do and haven’t yet had the chance to get done for the person.

Why – This type of contact can continue to increase their feelings of connectedness and share your ongoing support. There is evidence that even a simple form of reaching out, like sending a caring postcard, can potentially reduce their risk for suicide.

Studies have shown a reduction in the number of deaths by suicide when following up was involved with high risk populations after they were discharge from acute care services. Studies have also shown that brief, low cost intervention and supportive, ongoing contact may be an important part of suicide prevention. Please visit our Follow-Up Matters page for more.

This is a list of SUICIDE WARNING SIGNS

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill themselves
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, such as searching online or buying a gun
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Displaying extreme mood swings

Lines for Life has many local services for different types of individuals:

“Our highly trained staff and volunteers provide immediate assistance, compassionate support, and resource referrals that can put you on a path to healing.”

SUICIDE LIFELINE
Call 800-273-8255
Text 273TALK to 839863

 

 

 

 

Alcohol and Drug Helpline

Call 800-923-4357
Text RecoveryNow to 839863

Crisis Worker On the Phone

The Alcohol and Drug Helpline serves anyone who needs information, support or access to resources and treatment for alcohol or drug use. If you or someone you know needs help, the Alcohol and Drug Helpline is free, confidential, and available 24/7/365!

Call or text us for help understanding or dealing with alcohol and drug use or addiction. When you call us, we listen and support. We provide hope, referrals, resources, and information. Our highly trained staff and volunteers provide immediate assistance, non-judgmental listening, and compassionate support that can put you on a path to healing. 

Military Helpline:

GET HELP
Call 888-457-4838
Text MIL1 to 839863

Support for service members, veterans, and their families that is independent of any branch of the military or government.

The Military Helpline operates 24/7/365 and gives free, confidential support to service members, veterans and their families. Answered by veterans and others trained in military culture, our crisis lines offer compassionate, non-judgmental support and, where appropriate, connect people with the referrals, resources, or treatment they need through tough times.

In 2016, Lines for Life received more than 73,000 crisis calls—over 30,000 of which were to our dedicated military crisis lines. We talk with callers about concerns such as PTSD, finances, employment, relationships, and suicidal ideation. We de-escalate 95% of the suicide phone calls we receive to help callers find a way forward without the intervention of emergency services.

Every day, 20 Veterans die by suicide. You can support Veterans, military service members, and their families by donating to Lines for Life today!

Learn more about our military crisis support at militaryhelpline.org!

For Youth

If you are under age 21 and would like to talk with a peer about alcohol and drug use or abuse, contact our YouthLine. YouthLine is a free, confidential, teen-to-teen crisis and help line.

YOUTHLINE
Call 877-968-8491
Text teen2teen to 839863
Chat at www.oregonyouthline.org

A teen-to-teen crisis and help line. Contact us with anything that may be bothering you; no problem is too big or too small! Teens available to help daily from 4-10pm Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by Lines for Life).

Here are more links and resources:

Oregon Links:

Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare

The Center for Family and Adolescent Research

Central City Concern

Citizens’ Crime Commission

Compassionate Interventions

Oregon Liquor Control Commission

Oregon Addictions and Mental Health Division

Oregon Tobacco Quit Line
1-800-QUIT-NOW

Opioids: What You Should Know, Oregon Health Authority

Safe Use of Prescription Drugs and How to Get Help

Recovery Association Project (RAP)

Serenity Homes of Oregon

YouthLine

National Links:

Above the Influence

American Chronic Pain Association

The Anti-Drug

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
of America (CADCA)

Drug Enforcement Administration

Family-Empowerment Network

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

National Association for Children of Alcoholics (NACoA)

National Center on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD)

National Council on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University

Informed Families

National Institute on Drug Abuse

National Runaway Switchboard

Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)

Opioid Overdose, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

Reclaiming Futures

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Stop Alcohol Abuse.Gov

Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Troubled Teens

United States Office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention

JDRF Hope Gala Raises Over $500,000 to Fund Diabetes Research

JDRF Hope Gala Raises Over $500,000 to Fund Diabetes Research

Portland, Or. Over 425 guests attended the 23rd JDRF Hope Gala at the Sentinel Hotel on May 5th.  The event was Chaired by Larry & Suzanne Mackin and raised over $500,000 to fund diabetes research. Each year at the Hope Gala, the JDRF Oregon/SW Washington Chapter presents the “Living and Giving Award” to individuals or a company who are outstanding philanthropists, not only to JDRF, but to our community at large. This honor recognizes those who stand out as exemplary leaders and who have, for a long time, set the standard for  “giving back” in many ways.     Honorees receiving the 2018 Hope Gala Living & Giving Award were Jay & Renee Haladay. They took time for a photo with Judy Summers, Executive Director, JDRF Oregon/SW Washington Chapter and Gary Haines, Board President, JDRF Oregon/SW Washington Chapter.

2018 JDRF Hope Gala. Hope Gala Honoree, Jay Haladay; Gala Co-Chairs, Suzanne & Larry Mackin; Hope Gala Honoree, Renee Haladay

JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 (T1D) diabetes research.   In the last twelve years, JDRF has funded over $6.7 million dollars in grants covering research taking place in Oregon.  

The Oregon/SW Washington Chapter provides support and resources to those newly diagnosed and their families as well as children and adults living with type 1 diabetes. These include Parent Coffee Groups, Children’s Art Group, T1D Adult Group, a TypeOne Nation Educational Summit, Connections Support Program, Adult and Teen Care Kits and the Bag of Hope Program for newly diagnosed children.

 

De La Salle North Catholic HS Luncheon Raises $273,360 for Financial Aid

De La Salle North Catholic HS Luncheon Raises $273,360 for Financial Aid

Portland, OR. The Changing Destinies Financial Aid Luncheon drew over 225 people to raise funds for financial aid for students at De La Salle North Catholic High School. The April 26th benefit raised $273,360. At the luncheon, longtime supporter Steve Spence had a chance to talk with one of the students at the North Portland school. (Photo credit, Andrea Lonas Photography)

Senior Tyler White addressing audience during keynote speech

Cooper DuBois

Giovanni Battles and Ashley Rollins, both class of 2005

Cathy Rudd & Barbara Silver with student

Cyndy Maletis

Here’s a video which explains some of the details of the unique program.

From De La Salle North Catholic HS:

Thank you to our sponsors! 

Wieden + Kennedy

Clark Foundation

OnPoint Community Credit Union

Providence Health & Services 

Reliable Credit

The Standard

Walsh Construction

Our mission is to provide an affordable, college preparatory, faith-based education to young men and women throughout the Portland metro area with limited financial resources.  Over 325 years ago, St. John Baptist de La Salle, the founder of the De La Salle Christian Brothers and their schools, established the practice of providing a Christian education to the young, especially those who are most on the margins of society.  Today, along with the support and sponsorship of the De La Salle Christian Brothers (San Francisco New Orleans District), De La Salle North Catholic strives to continue this mission.

Since the school was founded in 2001, our school has continued to grow and develop into a community of dedicated teachers and staff who, along with our many corporate work-study partners and volunteers, provide our unique education to capable, motivated and interested young people.

What is so unique about our school:

  1. Our school turns no one away based on an inability to pay tuition. Even though our tuition is more than $10,000 less than any other private, Catholic high school in our area, most of our families still would find it hard to afford our low tuition.
  2. Every student in our school works five days each month at “real-world” jobs. Not only does the money they earn at these jobs off-set nearly 60% of the cost to educate each student, but the work experience is life-changing for them. We are a founding member of the Cristo Rey Network® of schools which, today, number over 30 and are located in every major urban area throughout the United States.
  3. In that we are a relatively small, faith-based school, we can provide a safe and supportive environment where students truly do “enter to learn and leave to serve” (our school’s motto).
  4. Our students don’t simply graduate high school; over 95% have been accepted to colleges and universities—each and every year.  Our students go to college with employable skills which help them pay for their college education, which ultimately, will help them break the cycle of poverty.  Their success is a result of a culture of goal setting and achieving high standards by blending rigorous academics, four years of professional work experience and Catholic morals.

So, on behalf of our religious sponsor, the De La Salle Christian Brothers, the Board of Trustees and the entire De La Salle North Catholic community, thank you for your interest and we invite you to come visit our students and experience how we are transforming Portland’s inner-city youth, one student at a time!

 

Junior League of Portland Hosts Inaugural Rose City Women’s Summit

Junior League of Portland Hosts Inaugural Rose City Women’s Summit

Portland, OR. More than 300 attendees came to the Hilton Downtown Portland for the inaugural Rose City Women’s Summit on May 11th. The Junior League of Portland hosted the event, a fundraiser for it’s community development fund, The 1910 Campaign. Sarah Burns, JLP President noted that this event “was an incredibly successful continuation of JLP’s legacy in our community to promote the development and potential of women. Organizers included Kristin Kilshaw, President Elect JLP, Sarah Burns, President JLP, Tarana Burke, Founder #MeToo, Danielle Caldwell, Fund Development VP, Fernanda Gwinner, Chair Rose Summit, Kim McNally, Co-Chair Rose Summit, Ashley Eil, Gretchen Corbett Award Recipient, KaDo Gorman, Past President -JLP

The attendees were inspired to be the change in their own world.” The Summit focused on diversity & inclusion which was woven into all aspects of the day including the keynote speech given by Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo Movement. It was also a time to honor women who have overcome tremendous adversity in order to change the course of their life. Ashley Eil, an instrumental part of launching this year’s Summit, received the first Gretchen Corbett Award for her outstanding service as a volunteer and advocate in Portland. The Rose City Women’s Summit raised around $30,000 for New Avenues for Youth, a Portland organization dedicated to the prevention and intervention of youth homelessness, and this year’s partner with the 1910 Campaign. (Photo credit, Helen Beavers; Firefly Photography.)

Tarana Burke with sponsors; Jim Carideo Branch Manager UBS Portland & Evelyn Jones, UBS Financial Services.

Tarana Burke Luncheon

Rose Summit Attendees at Closing Plenary

Attendees were able to enjoy engaging and inspiring talks from speakers around the country and around the region including Women’s Foundation of Oregon Executive Director, Emily Evans, who shared ways we can all support women at work, at home, and in the community. Jane Schwartzberg, Executive Director at UBS, shared her courageous story of life with metastatic cancer and how a change in perception can change your life. Keynote speaker, Tarana Burke, gave a heartfelt and engaging speech on how the seed for the #MeToo movement started over 10 years ago and how the focus needs to remain on the survivors and not the perpetrators.

Lunch was sponsored by the Junior League of Portland and UBS and included speakers Kristin Kilshaw, President-Elect of the Junior League of Portland; Jim Carrideo, Managing Director of UBS Portland; and Ashley Eil, Member Junior League of Portland who shared her story of overcoming childhood homelessness and the power of a relationship to change a life. The day featured a Marketplace which showcased local and regional vendors including Paper Epiphanies, Ground Up Nut Butters, Nothing Bundt Cakes, and Accessory Junkie, and provided opportunity for attendees to support local women-owned businesses.

The Junior League of Portland is an organization of more than 600 women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

Our House of Portland Raises $460,000 at Sold Out Glitter Gala

Our House of Portland Raises $460,000 at Sold Out Glitter Gala

Portland, OR. Over 500 supporters came out to support the annual Our House Portland gala. The sold out event raised over $460,000. Auction co-chair Tracy Curtis posed for a photo with Emcee Poison Waters and fellow co-chair Lisa Watson at the February 24th benefit. The Our House Gala “GLITTER” was a Disco themed event. Our House provides healthcare, housing, and other vital services to low-income people living with HIV. (Photo credit, Andie Petkus)

Kate Cary with Executive Director Mary Rita Hurley and Joe Morris 

Our House Board Member and Supporter Andrew Tweedie holds up his bid card.

Board of Directors Chair Bob Speltz supports the cause.

Stephen Cassell, with Mayor Ted Wheeler & Katrina Wheeler

Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, with volunteer Marcia Lovell and Director of Volunteers Kathryn Siebert.

From Our House:

Our House has been part of the Portland community since 1988.  Our services have expanded but our commitment to people living with HIV has remained the same.  HIV is a complex and challenging disease that can often be overwhelming.  The Our House team of expert clinicians works with people with HIV who are having difficulty managing independent living.  They tailor services for each individual that defines what “living well” means to them.

Over the years we have expanded services that now range from regular in-home visits by clinical staff to 24-hour residential skilled nursing services.  As the health of a resident or client improves or declines, we are able to continue to provide services within our continuum of care.

Our programs and services include: Our House, Neighborhood Housing & Care Program, Esther’s Pantry and Tod’s Corner.

Our House maintains an inclusive community where values, experiences and identities are accepted, where respect for differences is shared and where questions, dialogue and education are encouraged.

Non-discrimination – It is the policy of Our House not to discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, gender, gender identity, marital status, sexual orientation, age, sensory, mental, or physical ability, heritage, ancestry, national origin, political ideology, religion, or creed. This policy includes, but is not limited to, hiring, firing, layoffs, promotions, wages, training, disciplinary action, or any other terms, privileges, condition, or benefits of employment as well as non-discrimination in the providing of any services or activities of the organization.

Our House is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization based in Portland, Oregon (USA).

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