Portland, February 7th, 2016. The Oregon Historical Society (OHS), in partnership with local dragon dance teams, hosted a mile long parade to celebrate the Year of the Monkey. The parade started in Chinatown and finished at the Oregon Historical Society at 1200 SW Park Ave. One special attraction was 60-foot dragon that required 21 people to operate; it hadn’t been seen in public for at least 10 years. Oregon Historical Society is opening two new exhibitions including “Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion” and “Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns,” that will open February 29th. (photo credit, Andie Petkus)

The Portland Lee's Association Lion Dance Team has performed at thousands of events and is in great demand for performances throughout the year.

The Portland Lee’s Association Lion Dance Team has performed at thousands of events and is in demand throughout the year.

The parade started at NW 4th & Davis and featured volunteers from Portland Lee Association Dragon & Lion Dance Team.

The parade started at NW 4th & Davis and moved through downtown Portland.

Kerry Tymchuk, the Executive Director of the Historical Society connects with supporters at the celebration lunch.

Kerry Tymchuk, the Executive Director of the Historical Society, connects with supporters at the celebration lunch.

The Monkey is ninth of the 12 animals in the recurring 12-year Chinese zodiac cycle. Every 12 years there is a Monkey year. (Interestingly, Monkey years are all multiples of 12 — from 12 AD, through 1200 AD, to now in 2016.)

The Monkey is ninth of the 12 animals in the recurring 12-year Chinese zodiac cycle. Every 12 years there is a Monkey year and 2016 is one of those years.

“Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns,”

Coming up at the Oregon Historical Society from “Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland’s Historic Chinatowns.” Using both rare and seldom seen objects like Chinese opera costumes, theatrical sets, bilingual text, audiovisual media, and interactive visitor stations, Beyond the Gate tells a sprawling transnational story of contact and trade between China and the West, focusing on Portland’s Old (1850-1905) and New Chinatown (1905-1950).

1939 Chinese New Year, Portland

The Lan Su Chinese Garden is also a hub of cultural excitment for the New Year.

The Lan Su Chinese Garden is also a hub of cultural excitement for the New Year.

The Lan Su two-week celebration is popular with families and individuals and features lion dances, glowing lanterns, cultural activities, and more. The celebration ends with four nights of Lantern Viewing Evenings when the garden is illuminated with colorful lanterns and lively dragon processions.

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