Portland, February 13th, 2013. The Portland Children’s Museum is inviting supporters to step inside the pages of their favorite children’s books. A new interactive exhibit is transforming beloved stories like Peter Rabbit, Spot the Dog, and If You Give a Mouse a Cookie into 3-D literary adventures. STORYLAND A Trip Through Childhood Favorites runs  Feb 9-May 5, 2013. The Portland Children’s Museum is located near the Oregon Zoo, just off Highway 26.

Storyland at the Portland Children's Museum

The kick-off party for Storyland at the Portland Children’s Museum featured a reading of “The Cat in the Hat!”

Brian Mitchell (left) and Emma Mitchell (right).

Brian Mitchell and Emma Mitchell enjoy a book together.

Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites is very much like a really great picture book. It has a strong storyline, reads well, and has vibrant, engaging images. It also shows the critical piece readers bring to books and stories to make them powerful and memorable.

According to the Portland Children’s Museum, Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites is very much like a really great picture book. It has a strong storyline, reads well, and has vibrant, engaging images. It also shows the critical piece readers bring to books and stories to make them powerful and memorable.

STORYLAND A Trip Through Childhood Favorites | Feb 9-May 5, 2013

STORYLAND A Trip Through Childhood Favorites runs Feb 9-May 5, 2013

Here’s a bit of history about the Portland Children’s Museum:

The Museum opened as the “Junior Museum and Adventure House,” and programs included natural history displays, arts and crafts classes, and a pet lending library! As research on children’s early learning expanded in the 1970s, the Museum’s focus shifted to one of hands-on, experience-based learning. Though much has changed, arts and crafts like those taught in the 1940s continue to delight children and families today.

The Downtown Portland Rotary spearheaded a capital campaign that raised $10 million to move the Museum to Washington Park in 2001. This successful effort led to the renovation of the old OMSI building, a space five times the size of the former Lair Hill location. With the help from Rotary and a successful partnership with Portland Parks and Recreation that continues today, the new facility endowed the Museum with accessible program areas, space for a café and store, and a large amount of new exhibit space, a traveling exhibit hall and performance areas. At the same time, the Museum became officially incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Since the move, the Museum has hosted over 1.6 million visitors from across the country and the world, is home to Opal Public Charter and Museum School, and has become a regional resource for early childhood development. Within the Museum Center for Learning, educators are studying the needs of young children and the kinds of environments and approaches to teaching that inspire children to grow and learn.

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