Portland, OR. The Oregon Humane Society (OHS) honored heroic people and pets at the annual Diamond Collar Awards luncheon. The luncheon took place on February 20th at the Multnomah Athletic Club. Pets and people were recognized for their compassion, dedication, and resiliency. Organizers say the inspiring stories represent OHS’s mission of fostering an environment of respect, responsibility, and compassion for all animals. Pictured above is Kevvie the dog and Brian August. Kevvie was abandoned in the woods and suffering from gunshot wounds. OHS caretakers say this resilient dog took months to heal and trust again. Her gentle and forgiving nature allowed her to find her forever home with her new family.

Pictured above is Nancy Tonkin-Zoucha and friends

OHS Diamond Collar – Matt Zaffino and Sharon Harmon

“I am always so inspired by the OHS Diamond Collar Award honorees,” said Sharon Harmon, OHS President, and CEO. “Each of the recipients reminds us of the compassion and kindness in our community.” Harmon hosted the awards with KGW Chief Meteorologist Matt Zaffino.

OHS Diamond Collar – Ilene the kitten and Alanna Lundin

OHS Diamond Collar – George Piter and Squeak

Below are videos featuring the Diamond Collar Heroes:

George Piter: For 13 years, George and his trained therapy cats have dedicated time to visit Salem Hospital and brighten the days of patients and anyone else who may need it.

Ilene the kitten: A tiny but mighty kitten was born without eyes and discarded in the trash in Central California. After being transferred to the Oregon Humane Society for a special surgery, she went on to inspire a family and show the world that anyone can overcome their obstacles with love and determination. 

Joyce Briggs de la Fuente: Thousands of cats and kittens were entering Oregon shelters every year. Under Joyce’s leadership, she brought together animal welfare leaders, innovative planning, extensive research and data that launched the Spay and Save Program which provides an easy and affordable option to prevent unwanted litters of kittens. With this new program, Portland is now the safest place for homeless felines.

Kevvie the dog: After being abandoned in the woods and suffering from gunshot wounds, this resilient dog took months to heal and trust again. Her gentle and forgiving nature allowed her to find her forever home with her new family.

More about the Oregon Humane Society:

OHS is the largest humane society in the Northwest and adopts more animals from its Portland shelter than any other single-facility shelter on the West Coast. OHS puts no time limits on how long animals remain at the shelter—a pet stays available for adoption for as long as needed to find a loving home. If a pet in the care of OHS needs medical attention, the OHS veterinary hospital provides the pet with the same level of care you would want your own pet to receive.

Founded in 1868 by noted humanitarian Thomas Lamb Eliot, OHS is the fourth-oldest humane society in the nation. Eliot initially established OHS to stop the neglect and abuse of draft animals. The mission expanded to include companion animals and, until 1933, orphaned children.

OHS finds homes for more than 11,000 pets each year. The OHS medical team provides free and low-cost spay and neuter surgeries for thousands of pets owned by low-income families OHS educators reach more than 12,000 youths and about 2,000 adults annually through humane education programs. The OHS Second Chance program brings more than 8,000 pets annually to OHS from other shelters around the region. In the state capitol, OHS is the driving force behind efforts to improve laws that protect animals and punish offenders. 

 

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