Cannon Beach, OR. SOLVE is organizing beach clean-ups over the holiday weekend. In past years, volunteers collected 850 pounds of debris after the 4th of July. Oregon Parks and Recreation has established 32 drop-offs locations for debris collected on the beach. Debris dropped off at the collection locations must be in official SOLVE bags, which can be picked up at any state park or transfer station in an Oregon coastal county. Here’s a list where you can help out.

FEATURED PROJECTS

Mon.  7/04

1st Annual Devil’s Lake Cleanup, Lincoln City

Tues. 7/05

Road’s End Wayside Post 4th of July Cleanup, Lincoln City

Tues. 7/05

Treasure the Beach XI, Seaside

Sat.   7/09

2nd Saturday Cleanup, NW Portland

Sat.   7/09

Walton Beach Cleanup, Sauvie Island 

Sat.   7/09

2nd Annual Beach Bash – Tom McCall Bowl, Portland

Sat.   7/16

NWDA 3rd Saturday Cleanup, NW Portland

Sat.   7/16

Maddax Woods Monthly Cleanup, West Linn

Wed. 7/20

Surfrider Summer Beach Series at Beverly Beach, Newport

Sat.   7/23

Sustainable Slopes, Mount Hood

Sat.   7/30

Dahl Beach Land Care Day, Gladstone

Sat.   7/30

Free Volunteer Action Training at the SOLVE Office, Portland

Visitors flock to the tidepools near Haystack Rock during low tide.

Visitors flock to the tide-pools near Haystack Rock during low tide.

Fish, birds, and other aquatic life can mistake small bits of trash for food. This trash travels through these animals’ digestive systems often resulting in malnutrition, entanglement, and strangulation.

Fish, birds, and other aquatic life can mistake small bits of trash for food. This trash travels through the digestive system often resulting in malnutrition, entanglement, and strangulation.

Due to the increased use of plastic and other synthetic materials, marine debris causing increasing damage to ocean ecosystems and wildlife. Scientists estimate that more than 5 million square miles of the Pacific Ocean is covered with trash, and most of it is believed to be made up of plastic remnants from the world's shorelines.

Due to the increased use of plastic and other synthetic materials, marine debris is causing increasing damage to ocean ecosystems and wildlife. Scientists estimate that more than 5 million square miles of the Pacific Ocean is covered with trash, and most of it is believed to be made up of plastic remnants from the world’s shorelines.

SOLVE helps keep Oregon Beaches beautiful.

SOLVE helps keep Oregon Beaches beautiful.

SOLVE is working with the Oregon Tsunami Debris Task Force which includes representatives of State Police, Parks, Environmental Quality, Fish and Wildlife, Public Health, Transportation and the Marine Board, as well as local and tribal governments, state legislators, community organizations, and federal agencies.

For more information on how to handle beach debris, here’s a website:
From SOLVE:
SOLVE is a non-profit organization that brings together proud Oregonians (native and newly-transplanted) to improve the environment and to build a legacy of stewardship. By making connections between individuals, business groups, and service and conservation groups through volunteering and education, we are building a stronger tomorrow for this place we all love. This place that, let’s face it, is pretty much the biggest reason why we came (or stayed) here in the first place. We’ll take care of it, together.
The organization originally called S.O.L.V. (Stop Oregon Litter and Vandalism) was created by Governor Tom McCall and other community leaders in 1969 to address the need for community action in the ever-growing state. Today SOLVE is building on their vision with a strategic plan that will guide us as we work to improve the environment of Oregon and build a legacy of stewardship. 
In response to what is becoming an unprecedented amount of marine debris in Oregon, SOLVE has taken a leading role with partners Surfrider Foundation, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, Oregon Sea Grant and Washed Ashore, in forming a plan for a coordinated response. Our group, collectively operating as the Oregon Marine Debris Team, is working in an effort to engage volunteers in cooperation with local, state and federal agencies in marine debris removal projects. A network of 32 drop-off sites on the Oregon coast are now ready to receive beach debris washing ashore from the tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011. The drop-off sites are free and are a combination of state parks and independent recycling and transfer stations located in every county. Visitors and residents can call 211 (or 1-800-SAFENET) to report tsunami debris they see on the beach. The drop-off sites will accept debris in official beach cleanup bags produced by SOLVE. Beach cleanup bags are available at state park campgrounds.There will also be an increased number of beach cleanups scheduled on the Oregon Coast. Join the Marine Debris Team volunteer list if you are interested in helping with this effort.

Volunteer!

  • Pickup trash along the beach the next time you visit the beach. Bags are available at every state park and transfer station along the Oregon coast. Full bags can be left at beach debris drop-off points.
  • Organize a beach cleanup with SOLVE through the Project Oregon program.
  • Sign up to volunteer for ongoing beach cleanup efforts. 
  • Learn more about Tsunami Debris by visiting the Oregon Parks and Recreation Webpage.
  • Learn more about the impact of litter and marine debris on wildlife and water quality by clicking here.

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